Posts Categorized: DIY

DIY + holiday + Projects + valentine's day / Monday, 21 Jan 2013

Send a Valentine’s day care package

Being married to someone from another country we’re always away from family in some way so care packages are of utmost importance (remember the Ultimate Care Package?). And because you can pretty much send anything through the mail I got to thinking of all things heart shaped, which lead me to the idea of making a box, which lead me to think of paper mache boxes. I thought they’d be a fixture at Michael’s, but turns out they only sell small little 3 inchers so I had to buy one on Amazon. I’m sure it will get a bit of damage in transit, but I don’t really care because I think it would be a joy to receive if I do say so myself.
You will need: paper mache heart box 12″ (see link for where I bought mine), paint brushes, acrylic paint (choose your own, but definitely get a white), goodies to fill the care package (conversation hearts are a must!), pencil, eraser, white paint pen
Step 1: Paint the outside of the box pink. Paint inside if you’re hard core.
Step 2: Use a pencil and write in simple lettering your phrase.
Step 3: In a darker color, paint on the letters.
Step 4: Use white on the outside of the letters to create a relief.
Step 5: Do your goody thang.
Step 6: I used a white paint pen to write on the address onto the other side. 

I’m kind of stoked to take it to the post office and ship it on it’s way. There’s a chance it might be cheaper to send it with one of those flat rate boxes, but I’ll give it a go this way for ultimate impact. I’ll let you know. Paul’s brother is in for a treat.

Wanna see some more Valentine’s surprise ideas?
Heart attack idea
Heart attack in the lawn
Heart attack in the snow

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DIY + Life + Projects + Review / Thursday, 10 Jan 2013

Top 3 of 2012

I’ve been going through my pictures of the last year to make a synopsis in the next few days and I’ve noted two things: 1) If you didn’t know me in person it appears that I only make pretty things and go on trips (I wish!) 2) I’m getting better at what I do. And I don’t mean that in a “I’m the best in the whole wide world” way, but sometimes I’d cringe at what I was putting out there into the universe with my work because things didn’t work out as perfectly as I had imagined, but looking back though some were inevitably lame, I’m overall pleased with my oeuvre. I can see how I’m more mindful of a successful DIY from concept to styling to photography. Mind you, I worked super hard last year in coming up with my DIY concepts and execution so I guess it was a natural product of time and hard work. I got to work with some really stellar photographers (who I miss dearly!) and I got to make projects for some really great magazines and websites.

Based on page analytics, these three projects were the most visited on The House That Lars Built. I’m always so surprised at what is more successful over another project. What were some of your favorites? Would you have guessed these ones?

1. Friendship bracelet chevron rug won be almost double
2. Heart attack package beat #3 by almost double again
3. Kissing bridal clothespin

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DIY + Life + My Scandinavian Christmas + Projects / Saturday, 15 Dec 2012

My Scandinavian Christmas day 15

Day 15 of My Scandinavian Christmas is with….drumroll…me! Check out the other guest contributors to My Scandinavian Christmas here. There are some pretty awesome blogger and projects.
Ok, this holly and ivy balloon garland is not Scandinavian at all, but it’s one that I recently did for Hello Bee and it’s a super easy Christmas decoration to make for a party or for kids. I modeled it after my fruit balloon DIY. It’s pretty much the same concept, but with different shapes.

You will need: balloons, tape, scissors, twine, green paper for leaves, glue gun

Step 1: Blow up some balloons aso they are small enough to group in small clumps as berries.

Step 2: With scotch tape or double-sided stick tape attach a little to the balloon and stick to another. Clump in threes or twos.

Step 3: Cut out holly leaves in proportion to the size of the balloons. Draw or paint yellow veins on the leaves.

Step 4: Tie the groups of berries onto the twine and leave extra twine at the front and back.
Step 5: Glue gun the edges of the leaves to the edge of the balloon and a bit to the twine to secure it in place.
Donzo! That’s it! So simple!

Check out the rest of the amazing Christmas stories and projects for My Scandinavian Christmas here.

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DIY + Life + My Scandinavian Christmas + printable + Projects + Scandinavia / Friday, 7 Dec 2012

My Scandinavian Christmas Day 7

We’re already on the 7th day of Christmas! Welcome Eva Jorgensen of Sycamore Street Press! I first met Eva at the very first Alt Summit and we had a lot in common so we’ve stayed in contact ever since. It’s been fun watching her beautiful letterpress company and cute little family grow. Eva lives in Utah (where we’re heading!) but her family is Norwegian so her work is very Scandinavian-inspired so I thought she’d be a perfect fit.

Growing up, our home was always full of cheerful Scandinavian decor for Christmas. My great-grandmother stitched, sewed, and wove table runners, quilts, baskets and more while my Norwegian great-grandfather did all kinds of woodworking. Every year, they’d sell their handiwork at the Christmas bazaar put on by the Norwegian Seaman’s Church, and every year, my parents would pile my siblings and I into the car to attend the event. We’d put our names down for raffles, sample the cookies, and listen to the older folks speak in their melodic native tongues. We would purchase colorful ornaments, candlesticks, and pillow covers. Once in a while, we’d get lucky and win something in the raffle. Either way, my great-grandparents would always give some of their handmade goods to us, which we would proudly display in our home. 


For Brittany’s “My Scandinavian Christmas” countdown, I made a couple of illustrated ornaments that you can download. Simply print them, cut them out, punch a hole in the top, thread some ribbon or string through, and hang them up. Easy! My illustrations are inspired by the ornaments I remember hanging in my home growing up. One features a traditional Swedish Dala horse, and the other reads “God Jul”, which means “Merry Christmas” in Danish, Swedish, and Norwegian. 

Thank you SO much Eva! I LOVE these ornaments and will be making mine soon! Check out the wonderful collection of Sycamore products and their blog here.

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Crafts + DIY + holiday + Life + My Scandinavian Christmas + Projects + Scandinavia / Tuesday, 4 Dec 2012

My Scandinavian Christmas Day 4

Day 4 of My Scandinavian Christmas is by Pinja of Pinjacolada based out of Helsinki, Finland. Pinja has a wonderful blog showcasing her beautiful photography and fantastic DIYs complete with touches of bright colors and bold patterns.

This year I wanted to make a piece of Christmas decoration Inspired by the Finnish traditional Himmeli, which is an ornament made of straw and is hung form the ceiling at Christmas time. I wanted to keep it natural and simple by using the straw and wooden beads that I decorated with a little bit of white paint. The ornament hangs now on our tiny Christmas three but after Christmas it could still stay around somewhere in the house. 

p.s. This is the video where I learned how to make the Himmeli piece (clear even if you don’t speak Finnish).

Thank you so much Pinja for participating in My Scandinavian Christmas! And be sure to check out her wonderful blog. It’s got the best ideas!

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