Posts Categorized: flowers

DIY + etsy + flowers + Projects / Wednesday, 29 Aug 2012

How to make a floral crown: Part 1

GUYS, look at these! Seriously, this was one of the funnest projects/shoots I’ve done yet! The model, Cecilie, the photographer, Amanda, the flowers! I die. Ok, ok, we’ve seen floral crowns everywhere these days but I just had to try my hand at it. It all started last year when I spotted this painting by Lawrence Alma-Tadema at the Getty. Now, floral crowns are nothing new to the art historical oeuvre, but for some reason this one really struck me. Take a look at the full painting (it’s 179 x 80cm) and now imagine what a scene this could have been IRL. It depicts the Cerealia festival on the Roman streets. I mean, everyone is carrying branches and flowers and wearing them on their heads and playing instruments? This is my kind of town! Nuts!
Now, let’s make one ourselves!

Materials: With this version you don’t need anything but flowers! No wire, no glue, no tape, no nothin’. Perhaps just some clippers to clip the flowers down to a nice size. For the base of crown, I’d consider starting with greenery first. The more pliable the greens, the better! Try bending the stem first to make sure it doesn’t crack. If it does, consider using something else. For this floral crown I used black dahlias, tidsel (the greenery for the base), astilbe (the pink), craspedia (the yellow balls), and virburnum berries (the turquoise and purple)
Step 1: Cut and line up the first round of lowers for the base of your crown. Ideally, the stems should be 5-9″ long each. You can cut them down but it’s harder to work with shorter stems. I suggest using greenery first and then adding the colors into it.

Step 2: Lay one stem perpendicular on top of another. 

Step 3: Bend the stem under. 

Step 4: Bring the stem up to the top and then press it down so it lays next to the first.
Step 5: While holding the two stems in place with your left hand, place another stem on top and bend it under.
Step 6: Bring the stem up again and then place it parallel with the others.
Step 7: Repeat the process until it’s the size of the circumference of the head. I added some different greenery into the middle to create more of a focal point when it’s worn.
Step 8: When you get to the end, wrap the last stem tightly around the others to secure them in place, making sure that it doesn’t break.
Step 9: To finish off the circle, weave the last stems into the beginning of the crown by tucking them in.  
Step 10: Now you can start adding in other flowers. I added longer pieces first so that the shorter flowers can be seen on top.
Step 11: Place your show-stopper flowers evenly around the crown. I used black dahlias for this.
Finishing touches: Continue adding in your flowers evenly around the crown. I added in berries at the end for some extra exclamation marks. 
There are so many variations to this version, so feel free to experiment (I’ll be showing you a simple kids version soon!). You can switch off flowers for the base of the crown instead of adding the flowers at the end or you can keep it simple and just use one variety. WARNING: after this you’ll want to crown every flower you see. And yes, that’s a verb now. 
This project was made for the Etsy Weddings blog (SUCH a good resource)
Thank you Amanda Thomsen for the lovely photos! And thank you Cecilie for modeling!
Thank you Anja from Elefteria for the beautiful dresses! 
And lastly, thank you Lenore Rosendal for hair/make up!
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Europe + flowers + Life / Monday, 20 Aug 2012

Austrian flower boxes

Last week my friend, Melinda, and I took a quick trip to Vienna and Salzburg. We’ve talked about doing the Sound of Music sing-along tour for awhile now and she made it happen! It. Was. Bliss. All of it. More soon, but first! I GAWKED at the flower boxes on the homes driving through the Alps in the tour. I mean, EACH home at gorgeous boxes with perfectly draped flowers. Some had just one flower while others mixed it up with colors and different flower choices. I was really hoping to stop in and ask someone their secret to creating the perfect box. Any Austrian flower box creators out there who want to divulge their secrets? Ok, are you gawking too?!

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Copenhagen + denmark + flowers + In the Know + Life / Monday, 30 Jul 2012

Branch hunt

Paul and I went on a branch-finding mission on Saturday and he knew just the place. To get to work he rides through a nearby nature preserve that has its share of discarded branches. We struck gold with piles of branches, but also came across the most lovely wildflowers in various shades of purples, yellows, and pinks. I brought them home and assembled them into some simple, wild arrangements including some luscious sweet peas, which are super hard to work with I found out. I also found out that water pitchers must suffice for a lack of vases in the house.

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Art + Artist Feature + Design + flowers + Life + paper / Tuesday, 17 Jul 2012

Ummm, say what?

I don’t know what’s going on lately, but my breath has been taken away four times in the past week. One, two, three (on the way), and now this. My heart started racing as I started clicking through Lyndie Dourthe’s site. She has created the most wondrous little beauties I’ve ever seen and these little guys are made of paper. PAPER! And you know I’m a sucker for paper AND flowers. I die. I’ve been planning on doing more experiments with dying and painting onto flowers and now I realize that I should have. Can I still?
The packaging!

Check out all of her magical beauties here, but get out your Google translate or rack your brain from Mme Macy’s high school class ‘cuz it’s all in French.

via 100 Layer Cake

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Crafts + DIY + flowers + Projects / Thursday, 12 Jul 2012

Ombre flower holder

The last project of my DIY summer series is up on design*sponge. I made a flower hanger/holder for flowers and sticks and stuff, which I’ve found to be quite handy especially living near so much wonderful greenery. I’ve even attached it to my bike and gone around town collecting wildflowers and sticks to make my paper flowers. You can do the ombre part right in your kitchen with pots.

Thank you Hilda Grahnat for the photos and Amanda Thomsen for taking some more final shots.

For full instructions, check out the tutorial on design*sponge.

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