Posts Categorized: travel

Home + Interiors + Life + Scandinavia + travel / Friday, 24 May 2013

Gunillaberg part 2

Have you put Gunillaberg on your bucket list yet? Well, prepared to do so after this post. If you love some beautiful interiors, you’re in for a treat. 
If you’re just joining Lars now, I posted part one about our roadtrip to Gunillaberg, Sweden, summer palace of floral artist Tage Andersen (my creative hero). I showed the lovely grounds and animals in part one and today I’m showing the interior of the palace itself, which Mr. Andersen designed from the furniture to the flooring. It acts as both a house and a gallery. He exhibits artwork by a few different artists.
This chair in the office is my favorite.
And let’s talk about flooring. Because the painted wooden floors rocked my world.
A sofa that he designed with triangle pillows, of course.

 A close-up of the window-paned linen bedding. How gorgeously simple is it?

Beautiful stone bathtub.
And a selfie in the three-way mirror.
ROOTS ALERT! Or as we call it nowadays, ombre.

Guys, there’s more! As you daydream about this place this weekend, be excited for the next installment, which I’ll show more of the architecture of the grounds.

Happy weekend! 

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garden + Life + Scandinavia + travel / Tuesday, 21 May 2013

Gunillaberg, Sweden Part 1

When I found out that floral designer/sculpture/magic maker Tage Andersen had a summer palace in Sweden, I knew I had to go with my mom when she came to visit me in Denmark last summer (yes, I’m THAT behind on blog posts). It’s about 4 hours from Copenhagen by car and it will blow your mind. You must go here before you die.
It’s called Gunillaberg and it was owned by the first Swedish representative to America before America was America. Mr. Andersen bought it a few years ago and has turned it into a museum? wonderland? farm? gallery? All those magical things. This year there’s a brand new orangerie even. I’m going to walk you through. You start by entering through two topiaries. Topiaries mean that you know it’s gonna be good.
Then you pass some cows on both sides and I didn’t get any good photos but there were then dozens of potbelly pigs. POTBELLY PIGS!
Then, you pass this beautiful barn

 before coming to this little hut draped in burlap and checkerboard. It’s the sign-in, of course.

Mr. Andersen has created a number of topiary courtyards. This one is complete with whiskey barrel planters, which makes me feel really good because our rental right now has a few in front so I feel better about having them in our yard.

No Scandinavian locale is complete without chopped wood.

 or a bunch of roosters running around.

 More of those whiskey barrels.

And here I spotted Mr. Tage Andersen. I didn’t have the guts to chat with him this time around for fear of turning into Superfan, which I had already established when I tracked him down in Copenhagen at his downtown studio.

 Swedish flag.

 And oh, the details! Nothing is basic. Stacked branches to hold the water barrels.

“I think it’s T double E double R double R double I double F double I double C, C, C”. What movie?

 And now, we get to the palace doors.

 Just a sculpture of a tree. NBD.

 Ok, that’s all I’m going to leave you with for now. And the amazing part? It somehow gets better.

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Europe + Life + travel / Tuesday, 23 Apr 2013

Roussillon, France

I’m getting through my pictures from last year’s trip to Provence slowly but surely. A couple of weeks ago I talked about Gordes, and just 10 km away the landscape dramatically transforms into iron-rich soil and you come across Roussillon. It’s such a noticeable change in the appearance of the red cliffs and consequently, the colors of the town. Whereas Gordes feels blindingly white because of the limestone, Roussillon feels much more Mediterranean. Like a clay pot. The houses are saturated in bright, earthy colors. It’s a bit less formidable and a bit more reachable. Mom and I walked the town and discovered, like many other towns in Provence, the haphazard arrangement of the town plan, which is conducive to lots of nooks and crannies and, thus, lots of fun unexpected doors and windows. It’s a door-lover’s paradise! 

Colors of sorbet, non? 
I loved the iron-work detailing throughout the town. These metalsmiths had a good time.

 Watermelon house? Please and thank you.

 The view.

 Isn’t this a fantastic covering for a balcony? I note it here so that someone can use the idea for their own backyard.

 And we left at sunset. Sigh.

I dream about this place. Where do you dream about? 
More pictures from Provence: Gordes, our entry,  the town we stayed in Apt, walking around Apt
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Architecture + Europe + Life + travel / Wednesday, 10 Apr 2013

Provence–Gordes

I’ve been lucky to see what I consider some of the most beautiful places in the world. However, rarely has a place made such an impression as Provence. I’ve been having dreams about it. It’s a place that I would love to return to again and again and again. Which means that I need to get rich and buy a villa there, bien sur. When my mom came to visit me in Copenhagen in September we took a side trip (after MUCH drama including missing our flight–my fault–and thinking we could compensate by driving–nope!) to the south of France. I’ve talked about parts of the trip herehere, and here. Gordes was one of the most beautiful towns we visited. It felt more like a museum town in that it was quite pristine and glowing as the town is built of limestone. I wouldn’t say that you need to stay here if you’re visiting unless you use your holidays to lounge, swim, and walk around. My mom and I just loved soaking in all the architecture and as she said, her favorite part was looking at all the building materials. Nerd alert! But, alas, it WAS the best part. Look at the lovely shades of shutter colors! I mean, come on! 
Some of the photos might seem a bit repetitive, but it’s because the details were so lovely. There are complicated details in the ironwork on the windows and handrails. Some I just took pictures of because I wanted to remember details for my future villa. You know.

I must also mention the kindness of the people. The French in the South of France are kind, warm, and open. That, combined with the sun was the perfect escape from cold Denmark. 

I love what this person did. The town attracts loads of tourists and I’m sure they made braids on their doors to keep peeping toms like me out of their house.

A functioning water fountain! Yes, I stopped on the side of the road to quickly get this shot.
Leading into the town of Gordes is the Lavender Museum or Le Musee de la Lavande. Provence is the lavender capital and sadly we missed it all by a month or two. BIG SAD FACE. So we had to hit the lavender museum. I’d say it’s worth it if you like factory tours and such, like Mama and me. It shows the processes of how they make it and the history. We found it quite fascinating. At the end they lead you to a boutique where you can find all sorts of lavender products including an ointment that helps alleviate aches and pains. Sign me up! 
And, of course, it wouldn’t be a trip without pictures of doors and windows. 

 Majestic, non?

 Complete with bistro lights. Sigh.

 Here are the iron-work details. See what I mean?!

 Oh, and just a laundry rack. Covered with IVY!

 Too much for me.

 Swimming anyone?

 Have you ever been to Provence? What were your favorite places? In other words, where should I buy my villa?

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Europe + Life + travel / Monday, 1 Apr 2013

The Sound of Music tour

Preface: April Fool’s day is possibly my favorite holiday. But I’ve got nothin this year. FAIL! No need to read with caution.
Melinda came to visit me in Copenhagen in August (only 8 months ago. I’m way on top of life) and she asked, “where do you want to go while I’m there?” I had only one suggestion: THE SOUND OF MUSIC TOUR in Austria. Melinda knows Vienna (here’s the Vienna review) quite well and hadn’t been to Salzburg, so she, too, was all about it. Of course, we knew we had to wear outfits appropriate for the tour, but I didn’t have time to make outfits from cut-out curtains so I had to make due with a floral skirt. Melinda had found this divine yellow two-piece ensemble at FN92, a vintage shop in Copenhagen, that reads “mixed pickles” so, obviously, that was a given.
I grew up on The Sound of Music and I suspect a lot of you did too. I mean, did you imagine yourself running through fields singing “The hills are alive” or putting on puppet shows yodeling? I bet so. In other words, this was a dream come true.

Fun fact: my uncle was originally cast in the film role of Frederick, the oldest boy. Sadly, they found a boy at the lats minute who had a real British accent. Blast you authenticity! 
I had been dead set on doing the Sound of Music bus tour, but after reading the Yelp reviews, we weren’t so certain anymore. They were so across the board. We  looked into the walking tour with The Sound of Trudy, but she was all sold out for the day we were there. We decided to gamble on the bus situation and ended up on Panorama bus tour, the original. The tours are frequent and down to a science. I forget the name of our tour guide, but you can tell had had done led the tour millions of time joked after calculated joke. But I LOVED it. I ate it up. The bus takes you to the two houses that are used as the front and back facades, the gazebo of 16 going on 17, the chapel where Maria and the Captain are married, past the Red Bull headquarters (highlight!), and winding through the Alps with great views of the lake and flower-boxed houses (remember this post?). Oh, and a gladiola farm. HEAVEN (minus the Red Bull, that’s all the April Fool’s jokes you’ll get today from me).

Was it worth it, you ask? Definitely. Would I recommend it? YUP! Again, the reviews on Yelp were so mixed up that I can imagine a bad tour guide could happen, but who cares?! You’re in Salzburg with the Von Trapps? You’ll get caught up. Oh, and did I mention at the end of the tour while you’re cruising back to Salzburg, the guide puts on the soundtrack and you sing. I mean, I sang, I couldn’t really hear anyone else. But the girl from China came up afterwards and congratulated me on my voice. All I could say was, “I know it quite well”. This was only a day trip from Vienna, a lovely 3 hour train ride, and if I were to go back I might spend the night and do more Mozart stuff, because I also love him.

The End. 

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