DIY Epoxy Garage

When we moved into our home, our garage definitely became a dumping ground for all our “I’ll get to it later” things.  Getting it in shape was the last thing on our mind as we prepped for baby and settled in.  I mean, I dreamed of an organized, comfortable garage, but it definitely wasn’t a priority, you know what I mean? We needed a working toilet and a kitchen faucet. However, as luck would have it,  Rust-Oleum reached out and asked if we’d be interested in using their products to create a DIY epoxy garage floor. Oooo, now that’s tempting!

Brittany lies down on the epoxy floor wearing a two-toned pink dress.

DIY Epoxy garage floor

So, we readjusted our “to-do” list and added epoxy garage floor to the top of the list. I’ve seen epoxied garages at friends’ houses, but after finding out the pricing to have professionals come do it, I realized it wasn’t something I wanted to spend my money on. (Well, we ended up doing it to our studio floors in pink here, but that’s a story for another day).  

Turns out, you can DIY it, which is always music to my ears (though I’m sure not to my team’s 😉 and today we’re going to share how it went. 

Here’s everything we used to do it:

 

Step 1: Storage 

First thing was to get all of our stuff out of the garage.  Because it was springtime in Utah, we decided to rent a storage pod to put our stuff in in case it rained. We were charged a fee to deliver it to our house, a fee for a month, and a fee to remove it. I want to say it was like $300 total or something like that, which was worth it for us because we didn’t want to live in our junk for that time. The whole process ended up taking longer than expected for a few reasons, which we’ll mention so I’m so glad we did it. 

Remember, the cost of having it done professionally is exponentially greater. I’m thinking like $3-7k depending on where you live.

Step 2: Clean the floor

Once everything was out, we could really see just how dirty our garage had gotten.  With pressure hoses, leaf blowers, and brooms we were able to get all the debris out.  Another once over with the pressure hose and we were golden.  (We used this one HERE)

Step 3: Degrease

 A broom scrubbing degreasing solution on a cement floor

When you DIY epoxy you need a clean surface, so the next step was to get the degreaser and scrub scrub scrub.  You have to let it sit on wet concrete and keep it wet.  A little bit of misting from the hose worked well.  A deck scrub brush was the best to really get any oil and grease stains out of the concrete.  Once it was all scrubbed, it was time to get the pressure hose out once again.  

 

Step 4: Rinse

After a thorough rinsing to make sure there were no more suds from the degreaser, it was time to let it dry. We used my old landlord’s (you know the one who is basically our dad now) fans (he’s a carpet cleaner) and it dried the garage quickly.  

Step 5: Prime

Grey primed cement floor. There's also a paint roller and tray full of primer.

Then it was time to prime.  The tricky part about the primer and epoxy in the next step is that we had to wait for the temperature to get higher. The product requires a temperature of 60 degrees or higher and it just happened to get cold that week so it delayed the whole process by a few days. Once it got warmer, we painted the stairs and all around the edges where the floor met the wall.  Next we filled it in.  Paint roller extenders will be your best friend for this part.  You can get your whole garage painted in less than an hour with the extenders.  

 

Step 6: Epoxy

Pouring epoxy into a paint tray.

Once we let that dry, it was time to paint the epoxy.  We had the choice between grey and tan and I chose tan, but later found out that everyone else had secretly voted for grey. Ha! When in doubt I’ll always go for the warmer color.

After carefully following the mixing instructions, we also hand painted the stairs and edges again before grabbing the paint rollers.  Once we did, however, we had to work in small squares (roughly 7’x7’).  While the paint was still wet, we sprinkled colored vinyl chips (included with the epoxy) all over before moving onto the next section, which gives it the appearance of terrazzo but honestly, is great for amateurs because it’s hard to get a great clean finish with epoxy.  Once the whole garage was done and dried, time to do the same thing with a top coat.  Edges, middle, dry, check. 

Step 7: Wait!

After 3 days, you’re good to move your car and heavy items back in.  Voila!

Brittany sits on her epoxied garage floor wearing a two-toned pink dress.

What we learned

The DIY epoxy garage floor turned out SO MUCH BETTER than I could have imagined and though I know it’s an unsexy project, it added a level of comfort and dare I say luxury to our space. I feel WAY more comfortable walking on it barefoot to grab a drink in our beverage fridge or taking out the stroller. 

Here’s the thing I will say–the process was LONG! Because of the drying times for water and the primer and epoxy along with the temperature dipping, what we thought would be a week turned into three. We had a pod full of lots of our stuff on our driveway for that time. It wasn’t comfortable, but that’s just how it goes! Do it when the weather is awesome and you’ll have a much better experience.

Brittany lying on the epoxied garage floor wearing a pink dress.

Ok, happy to address any questions you have! This is certainly DOABLE and it totally increased my confidence in tackling more home renovation projects, which, as I’ve mentioned, is not always my forte. I’m much more comfortable with paper flowers. 😉 

Check out our video explaining our process!

The House That Lars Bought: Exterior inspiration

Colonial House Inspiration

Our house was built in 1991 or 1992 (all the records are different!) so clearly not a true Colonial (1700s-1800s). Plus, we’re in Utah so the colonial style is very much only inspiration. The House was designed very simply without too much adornment so there are a lot of directions it could go, but we plan on keeping it true to the style, but maybe just a bit more dressed up.

The first question is, where do we take it?

Here’s a reminder of what it looks like from a different angle. This was before we closed.

Inspiration #1

Because the shape is boxy and flat, a bit boring if you will, my first thought is to go all out à la Inspiration #1. We would do that by doing the following:

  • Add in dormer windows up top
  • Add some depth to the facade by adding in a portico and extending out the front door, rather than invert it
  • Widen the top middle window perhaps
  • Either paint the facade or lime wash it.
  • And, of course, LANDSCAPING, which gives me a goosebumps just thinking about it. But that’s a post for another day!
  • Adding in beautiful paned windows (ours need some help!)

The House That Lars Bought: Interview with Paul and Brittany

Working with Meta

Meta and I met when I first moved here almost 8 years ago. We were basically wearing the same type of dress and crown braids and it was like looking at a mirror. Over the years, we’ve bonded over our shared love of design. Somehow our styles are super similar. But whereas I focus on Lars with all the crafts and such (even though I studied and practiced interior design in the past), she is OBSESSED with interiors and spends every waking hour thinking about it. I’ve never seen anyone so passionate about it.

Here we are in the Bahamas where we were teaching some styling classes on a cruise ship. Ha! Just typing that makes me LOLZ.

Why are we working with a designer?

This is precisely why we’re working with her. She knows the current designers, processes, local artisans and contractors, trends, classics, lingo, vocabulary, history. It really is the perfect marriage.

Before we get started designing, like her other clients, she sent us her questionnaire and here’s how it went:

I can’t wait to share more with you this week. We’ve already got our eyes on the first room. Stay tuned!

You can learn more about Meta Coleman:

@MetaColeman_ on Instagram
Meta Coleman Portfolio

If you liked this, you might also like:

Affordable Rugs Under $1000
Introducing our new house
Our new floors

Introducing…the interior designer for our new house!

Finding our dream designer

It’s rare that your friend is ALSO your dream designer–it’s a serious dream come true. And Meta has always been on board to do it, even when we discussed my theoretical house one day years ago while we were living in a basement apartment. Knowing that she was just as excited about our new house as I was, was such a relief. Meta lives and breaths interior design. It’s truly her passion and calling.

Meta has been designing the home of Hannah Carpenter and I’m all about it! See more here. Photo by Hannah Carpenter.

FAQ

You may be asking WHY I’m working with another interior designer when I studied and practiced it. Simple! And other designers might be able to speak to this too–when you do something for yourself, it TAKES AGES. It’s so hard to design for yourself because I definitely suffer from decision fatigue. PLUS, I haven’t truly practiced it in many many years. I know what I like, but here’s the thing: Meta knows how to push you into new territory and she’s not afraid of risks. I’m not either, so I cannot wait for this ride!

Meta’s philosophy

And here’s the thing–I’m not talking just coping a picture you see on Pinterest and putting it into your house. That’s easy. The magic of Meta is that she takes you and whoever else lives in the house, and uses some sort of design alchemy to produce something new. It all of a sudden becomes an art. She has a number of projects that she’s working on behind the scenes and it’s been so interesting to see her process and her drive to do something new and refreshing. I couldn’t imagine doing this without her.

This is Meta’s beautiful home, which is a beautiful refuge for her and her family. Photo by Meta Coleman.

We haven’t begun the process yet. In fact, she has a thorough questionnaire that she’s having us fill out, and I think we’re going to turn it into a video, so stay tuned! So, we are truly in the beginning stages, but I have a few things in mind already and I know she does too so we’ll see how they align.

Progess of our house

Admittedly, we moved into our house prematurely, but we thought we’d get in with the basics and then move on up from there. So, as soon as the faucet and bathrooms were in, we were too! And now it’s little things like doors…door knobs…things that you don’t realize make a difference but truly do. We’re still a ways away from comfort levels, but all in good time I suppose.

I love this sweet bathroom she designed. Photo by Meta Coleman.

Finally designing the house!

As we continue to wait upon the small things, I’ve found myself sneaking in some “dream” moments, aka moments that get my excited for the next stage because heavens knows I haven’t entered back into that head space since the moment I laid eyes on this house years ago. We got a vanity for our main bedroom that I’m VERY excited about. It’s even better in person (and the quality is superb!) but I’ll be talking more about that later and with such a statement piece as that, it’s lead me down the rabbit hole of…you guessed it, WALLPAPERS! So, yes, you’ll be seeing a lot more soon.

I’ve spent much time in her home office here. Photo by Meta Coleman.

Another thing to note is that her style of designing a home is one that is more organic where we can find out how we live in the space and then enhance its use and function all combined with aesthetics. It’s not FAST fashion, errr: design, but a style that is intentional and thoughtful, which aligns perfectly with my beliefs too.

She worked on the home of our other dear friend, Eva Jorgensen and her husband Kirk. I LOVE this moody room! 

I can’t wait to share the full process with you. Like I mentioned, I don’t promise speed, but I don’t promise beautiful results and I know that will be the case because I have Meta on board. Stay tuned for more! And let me know if you have any questions along the way!

You can find Meta here:

Meta Coleman Portfolio
Meta Coleman Instagram
You can read more about Meta Coleman here in this interview

The House That Lars Bought: Designing our Main Bathroom

Designing our Main Bathroom

First things first–something as private as a bathroom wouldn’t have necessarily been my first priority in a house that still lacks door knobs and baseboards and straight up organization. BUT we don’t have a functioning sink in our bathroom nor adequate storage and I’m about to lose my mind.  For fear of appearing overly dramatic, that combined with the amount of trips to the bathroom I take (thanks little guy in my belly) and a CRAZY pregnancy brain (or is this forever?!) means that I cannot find ANYTHING! I used to have three hair brushes. Ask me when the last time I brushed my hair was. I can’t find anything! So, I’m imagining that with a nicely cared for bathroom, I’ll be able to find things again?

Where we are starting

Another reason to start with our bathroom is that I’ve been working with Signature Hardware who provided us with a beautiful vanity and some accessories, which means we are on a tighter deadline than we would if we weren’t partnering. Now, this is both good and stressful, right? Getting a room fully designed? Dreamy! But doing it while (hopefully!) moving studios, getting ready for the holidays (our biggest time of the year) and all while before baby comes by the end of the year.

Anywhoo, when I first started working with Signature Hardware, I had NO design in place. I picked out a vanity nonetheless because I had a time crunch. It’s this beautiful green one called the Olsen Console in Hunter green and white oak

I figured we’d make a plan somehow after that decision. It’s not usually how I like to start things, but deadlines are deadlines!

Wallpaper samples 

So, Meta came with what I had and went to work. She brought a ton of wallpaper samples over so we could get a feel for what this vanity needed to be paired with. Some of the ones we were looking at:

I shared some of the options on Stories and you gave such a wide variety of responses! Meta and I share a love of Josef Frank so those were obvious add ins, and then add in some florals and botanicals and I was having a tough time deciding! What would you have done?!

Then we narrowed it down to the winner, which is a Josef Frank classic, Eldblomman, in red. It’s a splurge for sure BUT since we didn’t need too much (that’s the beauty of bathrooms!) and we will be doing a wainscoting below then I kind of justified it…for my Christmas gift-ha!

After making that decision (turns out–a good portion of interior design is just making decisions), Meta came up with this mood board:

Main Bathroom Mood Board 

She included lighting options from Hudson Valley Lighting, who I am also working with, mirrors, artwork, wainscoting, rug, etc. Take a lookie:

And the color palette at the top and bottom? So dreamy!

And she created a very quick mock up to get the gist of the wallpaper and fabric together.

Isn’t it amazing?!

DIY Wainscoting

So, the plan is to do the wallpaper on the top 2/3rds (remember the rule of thirds!), then a DIY wainscoting that involves circle and diamond cut outs. I just ordered some unfinished wood and square pieces that we will apply to the wall and cannot wait to get moving on those! I’ll be sharing how to do that at some point so stay tuned.

Artwork

Paul LOVES Japan so Meta had the idea of including some beautiful Japanese block print art. I still haven’t decided myself what to do there–might need to try something new out.

Mirrors

The mirrors I’m particularly excited for. She did the coolest mirror treatment in her own bathroom at her house and she’s giving us the leftovers to do the same technique. She had bought some yellow glass and surrounded the mirror with it. We might try an unusual organic shaped design to go with the wallpaper or maybe something more uniform. Paul’s on the fence about it (read: doesn’t like the idea) but I’m ALL for trying things out. Any thoughts there?

Accessories

Like I mentioned in this post, I had bought those yellow and white striped towels because I loved them so much and they JUST SO HAPPEN to work marvelously with this design doncha think?

Towel and robe hook accessories

I had ordered a number of beautiful, vintage-inspired brass bathroom accessories from Signature Hardware that work so well with this design.

Flooring

Lastly, the rug. We haven’t gotten to that stage yet, but we have some ideas–just need to place the order. What would you do here? We installed the Stuga Tivoli throughout the whole house, which meant that we are covered for flooring. It also meant that creating a custom floor was out of the picture. Could have been fun to do some sort of checkerboard flooring, no?! But, a rug will do the same thing.

Window Treatments

You can see from this picture, that the room actually gets some lovely South-facing lighting thanks to the window here in the bathroom as well in the adjoining closet (think of the selfie pics?!?!?!?! Ha–kidding…kind of). Once again, Meta brought over some samples and we picked out a Soane and will turn it into a roman blind. For the closet, we’re still working on picking out something, but we’re thinking it’s going to be some sort of green floral. If you have any leads on one–I’m all ears!

Paint colors

We’ll be painting the wainscoting a beautiful blue along with the trims. And then I’ll talk about the closet below.

Main Closet

We’re also including the closet into the design. The plan is to go with an all over peach/blush everywhere. I remember learning that Jackie O painted her bathrooms a peach color because it reflected well on her skin and I’ve been wanting to do something along those lines too. This was a perfect place to do so! We’ll probably do the trims in this beautiful green color. See how all the colors work together?!?!?

We’ll also be doing the toilet room, which consists of the toilet and shower. It’s small and narrow and probably won’t be very interesting to see…but who knows?! Maybe we’ll try and make it interesting.

Ok! That’s it for now! Would love to hear your thoughts!

If you’re interested in more Interiors posts, here are some of my favorites!

Our new hardwood flooring
All the renovations we did to our rental
Affordable rugs under $1000

Our Office Makeover with Spoonflower

You’ve seen our house slowly coming together, but what about the teams’ office spaces?  Fun Pink floors? Check. But along with those fun pink floors? Boring white walls. We knew we wanted some more pattern and color down here so that’s when we started looking at wallpaper.  (Have you seen our studio mood board yet?)

This is what we were starting from:

Well, first when we moved in, the pink epoxy floors took a week to dry and cure so we had to work from the living room of our house. NOT ideal! Here’s a little glimpse. Poor guys.

Interior shot of a rom with office tables and chairs shoved in. There's clutter around and someone is sitting in a chair.

The foundation: Pink floors

Once the pink floors were in we could start moving everything down. A couple of months later though we added in baseboards and painted all the walls white. It became a nice white canvas.

The team added in some things we already had to make it feel better like the chandelier and floral rug that I got on sale from like 15 years ago. 

Shots of a basement space with pink floors and bare unfinished walls, then shots of the space with a plant, then with a rug, some simple furniture, and a brass light fixture. Some of the team is working in the background of the images.

Inspiration for the new office

This is what we sent over to Spoonflower to give the vibe of what we were going for:

A mood board featuring the floor color, an image of the office, some wallpaper samples, and images of other eclectic, colorful rooms and office spaces.

We ordered a few samples from various artists:

Five wallpaper samples in shades of green, gold, and yellow. There's an overall botanical theme.

From top left

Wallpapers we considered

  1. Holli Zollinger vines in rust. I love this print and wanted it to work but thought it didn’t go great with the pink floors.
  2. I LOVED this floral print of native Australian flowers but it was a bit too romantic for the vibe we were going for. By Das Brooklyn
  3. The lemons by Holli Zollinger were super on brand but it felt a little too contrasty.
  4. Loved the simplicity of the green pattern by Holli Zollinger (big Holly Z fans here!). I love green and pink together! 
  5. Vines in green by Holli Zollinger.
  6. You can see the rest of the patterns we debated over and still might use somewhere in our collection here. 

Once the samples arrived, we added them to the wall (they were peel and stick!) so we could think about them. We had a few factors to consider like the pink floors (everything must go with them!), scale, liveability (we didn’t want something so busy because Jane and Hailey work in there).

Two photos of the wallpaper samples stuck to the white office wall. In one you can see a bit of the doorframe and in the other you can see the top of a broom and some exposed light switches.

Foliage as a neutral

Our biggest limiting factor was, surprise surprise, our bubblegum pink floors. Who knew it would dictate so much of our design going forward, ha! 

We decided on the Green Vines. Anything with green foliage tends to act like a neutral since it’s in nature, yet it was also interesting, modern, and whimsical. A good vibe all around!

A sample image of Holly Zollinger's La Ville Vine Mint, which we used as our wallpaper in the office.

Coordinating trim colors

Next, the tricky part was figuring out what to paint the trims. I knew I wanted a few colors going on but when working with color, you have to be careful not to go overboard. I picked out a palette of a blue, yellow, green, and pink with a dash of tomato red, which you can see in these photos here:

Progress shots from testing out various paint colors. The green vined wallpaper is taped up with paint samples in pink, green, yellow, and blue around it.

I literally tried out dozens and dozens of different colors and got a few samples to try along with them. As you can see, I did it all at night (the bad lighting!) so we evaluated the next day. I decided to keep it to the same pink as the floors so that it would feel simple. 

Hailey got to work putting it up and she did a terrific job!

Hailey stands on a stepstool and installs the green vined wallpaper. She's wearing a striped t shirt and a tan skirt.

Removeable wallpaper

The best part about this wallpaper? It’s removable! And I know we’ve all had bad experiences with removable wallpaper, but this isn’t the case with Spoonflower’s. It’s sturdy enough to not stretch when pulled on and it’s quite simple to apply.

Interior shot of the finished office. The wallpaper is up, the doorframes are painted pink, there's a blue art print with colorful flowers on the wall, and yellow chairs are in the desks. It's vibrant, light-filled, and fun.

Interior shot of the finished office. You can see the wallpaper, the blue art print with colorful flowers, and the desk with an orange paper house and yellow chair, and you can also see a shelf installed in the closet that's filled with a rainbow of books.

Some of our application tips are shown below:

  1. line up 2 feet of the right edge first before working your way down. This prevents the piece from accidentally getting crooked. 
  2. 2 is better than 1! Grab a partner!
  3. Always measure, then cut a couple inches extra before putting on the wall. When you’ve got it all lined up, use an Xacto knife to cut off the excess.
  4. Don’t pull off the entire backing or you are sure to get into a sticky sticky situation. Unroll it as you go.

If you’re looking for more help installing your peel and stick wallpaper, this video that Spoonflower made goes through all the details. Check it out!

And there you have it! Some instant art and color in our offices, and we didn’t even need to call our wallpaper guy in!

Interior shot of the finished office. The wallpaper features prominently, as does the bookshelf with a rainbow of books and a poster from Craft the Rainbow.Shot of the finished office. On the left is the wallpaper and a corner of a desk with an orange paper house. Then theres a pink painted door frame, then a bookshelf full of rainbow books and objects.

Interior shot of the finished office. The wallpaper is prominent, and you also see the edge of a rainbow-filled bookshelf. Theres a desk with some office supplies and a yellow chair, and a poster from Craft the Rainbow. Interior shot of the finished office, featuring the wallpaper, a desk with a yellow chair, a laptop, and an orange paper house, a paper plant, and a blue poster featuring modern colorful flowers.

A brightly colored office. There's green floral wallpaper, a pink floor, a yellow chair, a white table, pink-painted doorframes, an orange paper house, a blue poster with colorful abstract flowers, and office supplies.A brightly colored office. There's green floral wallpaper, a pink floor, a yellow chair, a white table, an orange paper house, a blue poster with colorful abstract flowers, and office supplies.

As relieved as I am to finally get another room in my house done, it doesn’t compare to my team’s relief of not having to work in a white walled office anymore, phew! 

Thanks to our sponsor Spoonflower, for making this room happen! All opinions are my own.

Our new hardwood flooring and how to care for it

Which Stuga floor did we go with?

Which selection did we go with? I showed you ten options in the last post (remember these?) and…drumroll please….The winner is….
TIVOLIThey name all their flooring after Scandinavian inspired names or features and Tivoli, the famous charming amusement mark in the middle of Copenhagen, was the site of our first date, so it was only appropriate 😉 AND it’s our anniversary today so this flooring selection is really bringing us full circle I guess!
Mind you, Tivoli was not in your top 7 choices–ha! The top choices from you were Mead and Lucia. Here were the options again (you can see them here) BUT I love something on the warmer side and I wanted something a bit thinner without too much grain and Tivoli was the clear choice in person.
HOWEVER, when I received it, I opened up one box and the one I happened to open was SUPER grainy and a bit green:
I.got.nervous.
And then Paul calmly opened up the next box and then the next and turns out? Each one is super different! One may be more red, the other less grainy, the next more yellow and it’s kind of this mix and when you put it all together it is LOVELY. The depth of all the colors and textures makes it super interesting without being distracting. I LOVE MY FLOORS.

Making it into the house

Anywoo, just getting the shipment of hardwood flooring in was the biggest deal to me that I recorded the whole thing. And it came with its own share of drama. Our house is perched on an incline so no big trucks can get up there, and if they did, there’s no room for them to turn around and come back since it’s a cul-de-sac. SO, I called Paul in a panic and he came with a good friend of ours and helped the guy unload each crate and then transport each box up to the house. Thankfully, I’m pregnant, so I have a great excuse to not pitch in 😉

Here’s how the process worked, but I’ll be sharing more about the installation process in the next blog post.

What did we do to the stairs ?

And then they came back the next week and put the stairs in with the specially made Stuga stair nosings. We went with the square nosings, which is much more modern than I’ll be going with the rest of the house but I think it freshens up the house quite a bit and I’m here for it! I LOVE where it’s going. We still need to finish the top half (not seen) and add in banisters, but in the mean time, it’s so beautiful! Jasper, don’t come near here!

How to care for our Stuga floors

As you can imagine with this type of project, we have a ton of foot traffic from contractors of all kinds and their footprints are not what we would call gentle so this flooring is probably going through more now than hopefully it will ever again. BUT, I do love what Stuga says to maintain it.
Their first piece of advice is to treat your hardwood flooring like the Scandinavians do by taking off your shoes. I know this is common practice in a lot of homes throughout the world and frankly, though I lived in Denmark for awhile, I still don’t adopt it BUT you better believe we will be! And fun fact: a lot of Danes, probably others too, typically leave a basket by the door with extra slippers you can put on. Hyggligt!
We also don’t have window coverings at this point–only plastic from the previous owners who were about to paint, so I’m terrified of the sun’s exposure on the wood. It does patina over time and I’m looking forward to that, but I don’t want to accelerate it you know? I’ll be getting something up soon!

Other than that, I ordered the floor care kit and it comes with everything I need to take care of it. Pretty much it’s what you might expect light water. They also say that you can sand the floor down twice and that’s pretty much only if you want to restain the wood. So we are good for a long time!

And because we need to add in something adorable, here’s a little before and after of Jasper on the floor.

Ok! I’d love to hear your thoughts on our hardwood flooring selection. I know it’s not what most of you chose, but can you see it now?
ALSO curious if you’re like the Scandinavians and take off your shoes at the door?

This post is sponsored by Stuga but all opinions are my own.

Brittany’s Master Bedroom Makeover with Spoonflower

 

We partnered with them earlier this year on some new pillows for my living room and some custom fabric to make a lampshade (see here) so I was already familiar with their great quality and options. And, because I had already done a lot of research on artists and fabrics, I knew exactly where to look. Their marketplace can be overwhelming because of the sheer amount of designers and products, so I spent a good deal of time making collections for each room. That was the easy part. Narrowing down the favorites list was the tricky part. You know the feeling, right? You can take the design so many different directions so you don’t know where to start???

What do you do??! 

How to concept your interior design

Start slowly! I decided to start with mock-ups by placing the products together to see which ones were really pulling me in.

Playing around with options I was able to visualize how to put together different patterns and colors, one of my favorite things to play with. I had so many favorites that I knew it would be tricky to put them together so this helped me narrow down.Spoonflower concepts

To custom headboard or not?

I contemplated making a customized headboard, especially because the beauty of Spoonflower is that you can pretty much customize ANYTHING you’ve ever wanted. They have the ability to put any design onto any products and now, even more so! There are curtains, throws, wallpaper, bedding, you name it. Ultimately, I decided against the custom headboard because I wanted to save on time and headache so I knew I was probably going to find a solid colored one, since those were my options out on the market. Because of that, I wanted to add something decorative to the walls.

Concept 1

There’s one designer, Amy Vail, who references a lot of William Morris patterns and I’m INTO it! Look at this beautiful leaf pattern. I thought it could be fun to play around with some red gingham, like this one from another favorite designer, Peacoquette

Concept 2

I’m loving on some pink right now and wanted to try it out on my walls. Here’s how it goes:

I also contemplated this fun berry and vine stripe pattern in pink from Danika Herrick. I still love it so much, but I think I’d love to try it for a girl’s room one day. Danika also has some really lovely chinoiserie patterns. 

Concept 3

I knew I wanted a wallpaper, especially since theirs is renter friendly, so most of my mock-ups kept that in mind. However, in case my landlords wouldn’t go for it, I came up with a solid color paint choice that would still work. A beautiful grey/blue could do the trick:

I found that blue and white stripe and I thought it was so so pretty (clearly I thought it was pretty, as I eventually decided to do the entire bedroom with it!). The stripe is by designer Jenlats.

There’s already a blue theme going in Jasper’s nursery (see here) and I knew it would be fun to switch it up a bit so I tried out a blush pink (you know, because we haven’t seen that color ANYWHERE these days 😉 

Concept 4

I love bringing greenery into a space because it really refreshes it, so when I found this green botanical print, once again from Peacoquette, I thought it would fit the bill beautifully. Then, I spotted this black and white striped headboard that would allow me to play with color and patterns all along with these pink art nouveau daisies that would be in the Spoonflower curtains. Top it off with this calico throw pillow and we’re good to go! 

As soon as I spotted these headboards (here and here), I knew they were the perfect way to contrast the busyness of the wallpaper with the bedding. It needed a respite with a solid color. 

Final concept

The more I looked around and played with the arrangements, I was able to gain a stronger sense of what I wanted so I started bringing in more furniture. My natural inclination lead me to go to the yellow headboard and that’s what I ended up basing my decisions off of.

When I have elements that are more whimsical and botanical like the butterfly bedding, I typically like to have a few other elements that are more streamlined like the lighting fixtures. I found this rad surface lamp from Cedar and Moss called Belle and though it could have leaned too modern, I love how it toned down the whole design and made it feel less, for lack of a better word, “frou frou”. Plus, I loved the idea of bringing in traces of black throughout the room because of the black in the butterfly bedspread.

I’m SO into rattan and wicker right now. You too? I love that it’s slowly been making its way into our vocabulary again, and not in the 80s overdone, fluffy way. It’s become cleaner yet still warm. If found these sconces that did not break the bank and I love them so much! They add the perfect amount of texture.

Finding the right side table has been a bit trickier. I still haven’t bit the bullet yet. I loved the idea of bringing in another color and pink would be great so I found these side tables that would be great but then I also love this peacock blue one. Which one would you go for? 

Before photos

Now, before we get more into the final photos, I want to show you the mess that we were working with. You ready for this? Big gulp….

OUCH! This hurts. I didn’t even clean up for you! You’re welcome! It’s a small room, about 10×10’ with plastic vertical blinds, beige carpet. I painted it white a few years ago so at least there was that. I like to say that the worst before pictures make the best after photos.

Now, you ready for the full reveal???

Final bedroom design

This chair above is one from my grandparent’s home. I haven’t changed the fabric at all, but I kind of like how it works.

I had a little helper who loved jumping his way into the scene. Can you spot him? I’m sure it’s tough 😉

Bedding

Who doesn’t want glorious bedding to sleep in? This duvet, sheets, and shams not only make the design pop, they also make your bedding luxurious. The bedding pieces are made of cotton sateen, which has such a lovely polished look and feel. Jasper loves to snuggle up in it and spread his cracker crumbs everywhere. Yay!

Ok, sorry, I got distracted there…here’s the rest! 

Curtains

I decided to continue the stripe from the walls to the curtains. I loved the idea of an all over pattern (anyone remember Chloe Sevigny’s bedroom?!). And with this particular stripe, it’s just small enough where it’s not too contrasty and because it’s all over it begins to feel more like a solid. I wanted to add a bit of pizzazz into them so I found some yellow trim and handstitched it onto the edges. Love how it turned out! Voilà!

Throw pillows

Spoonflower offers SO MANY choices (over 750,000 patterns) which can be overwhelming but more importantly inspiring!  I loved that there were so many choices for the throw pillows and I had many options to mix and match. PLUS I love supporting independent artists and Spoonflower brings them all to one convenient place. You can find the links to the individual pillows in the product round up below!

Surface mount

Here’s the gorgeous surface mount I was telling you about from Cedar and Moss. Isn’t it so pretty in the space?! 

And let’s end on a few more of the Boo because he just makes everything better. 

So sweet–trying to hit the camera lens. Doh!

I was showing my good friend, Merrilee, pictures of my new room and she reminded me of one of my favorite inspiration images of all time that I realized I was unconsciously referencing. Right?! 

This was also one of our This Girl’s from a few years ago. Take a lookie here.

Spoonflower selections

Here’s a round-up of all the Spoonflower products we used to make this bedroom happen. From the curtains to the wallpaper and bedding, it was all Spoonflower!

  1. Stripe wallpaper
  2. Throw Pillow
  3. Throw Pillow
  4. Throw Pillow
  5. Throw Pillow
  6. Throw Pillow
  7. Throw Pillow
  8. Throw Pillow
  9. Bed sheets and Pillowcase set
  10. Stripe Curtain Panels
  11. Queen Duvet Cover & Shams

 

And here are all the accessories and furniture I used and/or I need your help deciding on! 

  1. Cedar and Moss surface mount
  2. Curtain rod from Anthropologie
  3. Pink side table from West Elm–should I go with this one? 
  4. Rattan Sconce from World Market
  5. Velvet mustard headboard from Target
  6. Peacock blue side table from Schoolhouse Electric–or should I go with this one?
  7. Metal side table from Schoolhouse Electric–or this one??

The flower decorations below the sconces are vintage items that I found at the Brooklyn Flea ages ago!

I really do love working with Spoonflower because of the limitless opportunities to customize and find great designers. I know that if I want to tweak the color for whatever reason I can approach the designer. I didn’t do that in this case, but it’s good to know that I can.

Head on over to Spoonflower to check out their new bedding and product collections. They’re so good!

This post is sponsored by Spoonflower. Thanks to the brands who allow us to focus on clever and original content for you! 

Interior Design Trend: Favorite Spoonflower Artists

Wallpaper is one of my favorite interior design trends–though can we really call it a trend if it’s been around for so long? Either way, wallpaper is in and here to stay and I’m so glad because–COLOR and PATTERN! It opens up so many possibilities in a space, and it’s doable as a DIY.

You’ve probably seen me use Spoonflower wallpapers (and fabrics!) before, like in my old master bedroom makeover, this summery tablescape, a fabric-covered lampshade, and most recently this DIY duffel bag picnic blanket tote. And while I can’t say more now, keep your eyes peeled for some more Spoonflower fun coming up soon. 😉

Lamp customized with spoonflower fabric from Holli Zollinger against a wildflower covered wall.

Favorite Spoonflower Artists

I’ve made it super easy for you to get to these artists’ work–just click on their name or their artworks to be instantly transported to their shops!

Holli ZollingerHolli Zollinger fabrics on Spoonflower

I haven’t done the math but I’m thinking Holli might be the most prolific artist on Spoonflower. She has over 3700 designs and they’re all good! She has more of a boho flair intermixed with some more French-inspired styles. I think she’s open to customizing them too if you ever need it! I’ve used a number of her patterns like on this lamp. And stay tuned for our upcoming office makeover! You can see some of my favorite Holli designs in our collection here.

Helen P Designs

favorite spoonflower designers

I picked out a few Helen P Designs for our office makeover like this oranges above. I think it would also make a great dress!

Design by MLagsfavorite designers on Spoonflower

I’m in LOVE with these gorgeous moody florals from MLags!

Modern Colorist

If some of these look familiar from our DIY duffle bag picnic blanket tote, that’s because these are my sister’s designs!

My sister has done freelance pattern work and in-house pattern work for a number of companies and she’s so good. She’s put past patterns into her Spoonflower shop.

Mandy England

I thought this floral would be fun for a girl’s room or something!

Willow Lane Designs


Designs by Kelly Attenborough


Designs by Muhlenkott


Peacoquette

If you’re a big fan of William Morris, Peacoquette’s Spoonflower shop is the place to find William Morris-inspired wallpaper designs (and more). Also, I just noticed that she has over 4500 designs! She wins the contest!  William Morris inspired designs.
Das Brooklyn

 

Crumpets and Crabsticks

Designs by Kate Rhees


Ramarama


Melissa Hyatt Fabrics
Fern Leslie Studio


Forest and SeaAugust Croft


DomesticateDanika Herrick

We used Danika’s Citrus Grove Toile for our Mother’s Day tablescape last year so it’s a personal favorite. 

Lana Red Studio

Lana Red’s designs are geared toward fabric and home decor over wallpaper, but I couldn’t resist showing you her work anyway.

Katie Kortman

Katie is a friend of Lars. She even was a featured artist in Picture Hope Coloring Book. She makes the coolest clothes with her self-designed fabrics. You can take a look at them here on her Instagram.

Mia Maria

Mia has some awesome stripes and plaids that would be so fun for clothing and upholstery projects. They’ve got my mind racing!

Julia Schumacher

I LOVE her blues!

Lily Oake

Really dainty and feminine florals and perfect accent ginghams and stripes.

Atelier Dorina

Spoonflower collections

One of my favorite things to do with Spoonflower is to add all my favorite designs to my “favorites” folder. And then if I’m working on a specific project, I like to make a folder and all the patterns I’m considering for it in there. You can see some of my collections here:

Your Favorite Interior Design Trends

Are you a fellow pattern lover? Do you have a favorite interior design trend? Let me know in the comments, and don’t forget to share your interior design photos with me on Instagram with #LarsAtHome.

How to paint a folk art cabinet

Cabinet for extra storage

Because our house was gutted when we bought it, there was absolutely no storage. Part of the plan from the beginning of the renovations was to add in as much storage as possible. Having an extra storage space in the main bathroom means we have a great place for our medicine cabinet, toilet paper, towels, and more. It’s been so helpful! You can see the full bathroom renovation here. This lead the way to painting in the decorative folk art style.

How to paint folk art style cabinet

While the unfinished cabinet was beautiful on its own, I knew there was so much potential to make something customized to the space. You know I’m a glutton for color and pattern and I tend to think that it’s always possible to make it work so I had to try it out in the folk art style.

unfinished cabinet

Scandinavian Wedding Cabinet

When I lived in Denmark I got to spend a lot of time going through antique stores and their museums learning about their folk art (all thanks to not being able to get a job for awhile–it had some perks ;). I fell in love with the traditional Scandinavian wedding cabinets where the couple would paint the year on the cabinet. Here’s a couple of beautiful examples from The Tolstoy Edit.

wedding cabinet in folk art style swedish style wedding cabinet

With that in mind, Gwen made a sketch inspired by these wedding cabinets in the folk style and also taking into mind the existing Mission style of the cabinet itself.

swedish wedding cabinet

The plan was to add the date on. We tried it, but it wasn’t quite working for me. Thanks to the power of paint, we could easily repaint over it.

Selecting a color palette

Working with an already busy wallpaper, a green vanity (also from Signature Hardware), there was already a strong color story going on. I wanted to use a palette that worked with the dark green of the vanity but also brought some depth.

At first we selected a brighter red that I can only describe as cranberry, but it was a little too close to the wallpaper red but not different enough.

repainting cabinet red

Re-painting your cabinet

We painted the whole thing before we discovered that it wasn’t really working SO, we tried out something deeper and we ended up a color that had some purple in it. We added in a yellow to the inside of the wood panels. I’m the one who took over the paintbrush at this point. I knew we could repaint anything so I was super sloppy, but take my advice and don’t do this–try and be as clean as you can while you go. You could go into a never ending state of painting and repainting.

changing the yellow

THEN, I decided that the yellow wasn’t quite working either so we had to try a few other yellows out and finally settled on something with more mustard in it.

prep your cabinet

Paint your own antique-inspired decorative cabinet

We learned a lot from painting this cabinet in the Scandinavian folk art style. It took A LOT of time and honestly, there’s a lot of details to clean up. BUT, Gwen is sharing what she learned.

Painting tips and tricks

  • If you’re starting with already-painted furniture, prime it before adding more paint.
  • If you’re starting with untreated wood furniture like us, just make sure it’s smoothly sanded and dusted before you start.
  • Make a plan! Sketch out the colors and designs before you get started, either on paper or in illustrator or a similar software.
  • Choosing colors–establish a color palette before starting and stick to those colors.
  • Tape tape tape! Use lots of tape and make sure you get a good seal. Make sure you read the instructions to your brand of tape.
  • Don/t be afraid to repaint things–and if the paint is too layered, sand it down first.
  • We used flat or matte paint so that there would be no gloss at all.

prep the cabinet with painter's tape for decorative painting

How to add paint perfect dots

We thought about adding in some dots down the vertical panels. I think there’s still hope to it but I think there would need to be more of them and they’d need to be closer together. What do you think? Well, I think something could go there, not sure if it needs to be polka dots exactly. We used a

how to paint dots on the cabinet

To achieve the perfect dots, we used a circle sponge paintbrush. It was perfect! Maybe a little too perfect? I’m even wondering if I’d like it better if they felt more handpainted. Maybe with a contrasting shadow? I don’t know!

Swedish inspired bathroom wallpaper

Painting folk art decorative flowers

Gwen added in some loose flowers to the larger panels and I love them! She added in a contrasting shadow element for each plane of color and it was the perfect amount of detail.

floral artwork for folk art cabinetScandinavian style painting in the folk artfloral painting in the folk art styledecorative painting in the folk art style

I love how the cabinet turned out. It’s still missing knobs so I do need to figure that out. It definitely needs some because the magnets are seriously so so strong that you can’t open it otherwise.

Our home renovations

If you want to see more of the house renovations check out these posts:

I’d love to hear your adventures with decorative painting in the folk art style. Let me hear your tips! 

We’re moving!

We’re Moving Studios!

In our house looking we intentionally looked at houses where we could potentially put Lars in the basement. It’s very common here in Utah to have a basement and to put renters in the basement. A majority of our neighborhood does that. In fact, our previous apartment was one such arrangement. So when our dream house showed the potential to be for sale (it wasn’t for sale when I knocked on the door!), the large basement was definitely a plus. With three floors at about 1500 square feet each-ish, it would have been WAY too large for just the three almost four of us.

Here’s how the basement was when we first looked at it and basically still is now:

And yes, doors still haven’t gone up! You probably can’t tell with all the blockades, but there is about 1500 square feet, 3 bedrooms, one larger work room and a storage room along with two bathrooms. One bathroom, in fact, that gave us a sewage flood when we first moved in. How welcoming. I’d share a pic but I don’t want to make you barf. We finally got new walls done there (they had to take them out because the poop hit all the walls) and now we’re working on the flooring.

Pros and Cons to working from home

Of course there are pros and cons to having your work place in your house, but overall, I am STOKED! Especially since I’ll be with a newborn soon and wouldn’t be able to get to the studio much. Our current studio, we were all commuting from the same city to about 20 minutes away, which is fine, but it didn’t make any sense.

Plus, this blog is such a part of my personal life and it was oftentimes SO tricky to work between the two. Sometimes we’d need to shoot at my house and sometimes here at the studio. Being in the same spot will alleviate so much confusion.

Another plus is that all my materials are here at the studio and so I was finding that I wasn’t making anything in my spare time because it was so much planning and execution to bring what I needed home. I’m so stoked to have it all in one place.

I’ve worked from home in the past but that’s when I didn’t really have a designated space for it so it was ALWAYS a mess. Now, the mess will hopefully be contained!

Flooring for our basement

Speaking of flooring, I’ve looked into all types of flooring options for basement apartments that are prone to flooding. We know the sewage flood we had was not the only flood this house has had–we’re hoping it’s the last though. With that in mind, we are wanting a flooring that is waterproof and/or easy to maintain in case of water damage.

We looked at LVP, waterproof tiles, painting concrete, and epoxy. I had looked into epoxy when we first moved in because my friend, Eva, has it on her concrete floors and it’s amazing (you can see it here). It came out this wonderfully shiny texture that I LOVE! But her guy quoted me a crazy high price and I was determined to find something else. THEN, I got a hold of another guy who was MUCH less expensive. He comes on Saturday so I can’t comment on his services yet. We’ll see.

What color should we paint our floor? 

That leaves the question…what COLOR do we do for the epoxy?! And that’s the beauty of it. You can pretty much customize your epoxy to ANY color you’d like. Most epoxy installers do garage floors and that typically means any variation of grey, but I shared a couple of images with him and he said he could do it. I asked him about MINT/SAGE:

And about a blush pink:

So…what would YOU do???

Green OR Pink?

You’ll have to wait and see what we chose!

Investing into a rental

As for the rest of the basement studio, the idea of it being in my permanent house is SUCH a relief and bonus for many reasons. One, I’m realizing that I have a REALLY hard time with permanence. For example, I had a hard time investing time and money in both studios I’ve rented. I know that your environment plays a crucial role in the overall vibe and well-being, but for some reason, I just couldn’t get behind fixing our current one. We painted a couple of rooms white because we needed them for shooting and changed out some lighting fixtures, but besides that, not much.

SO, I’m excited to DIG in and get the vibe for our studio that it finally deserves! And I’m wanting to go CRAZY on it. LOTS of color and experimenting. I’m talking color on floors and maybe carpeting up the staircase. Maybe something fun with walls and definitely furniture!

Inspiration for the new studio

You can see the inspiration for the new studio up in the first two photos, but I’ll expound here.

I LOVE this restaurant in Moscow by Studio Shoo. I think it’s an incredible blend of playful, patterns, vintage, and color. Check out more of the restaurant here. It’s so good! Love the green drinking fountain. Could you imagine?!

2LG Studio in London is another major inspiration source. They have SO MUCH FUN with their interiors. I love the way they use pattern and color together while adding unexpected details here and there.

This one, below, is a study in careful placement of color for big impact. That staircase is just paint! It’s the studio of @ZilverblauW in The Netherlands. You should check out her account. It’s so good!

And lastly, this one. I found it here, but don’t know who the designer is. Anyone know? Such a great palette and play on shapes and color.

With these inspiration images in mind, here’s what I have in mind:

  • COLOR everywhere in unexpected places
  • Clever use of paint to create frames and shapes
  • Mix of vintage and new
  • Functional but also aesthetically pleasing
  • A place to shoot and video easily
  • An inspirational place to work

Some places will have to be WAY more functional, like the stock room and storage room, but that means we can really play wit the playful rooms.

Anywhoo, I and we are SO excited about the move. The lame thing is that it’s RIGHT in the middle of our busiest time of the year so we’re going a bit nuts. That sounds par for course this year, no? Wish us luck!

And let me know what flooring you’d choose. Would love to hear why!

If you liked this post, you might also like:

She Shed Craft Retreat
One Room Challenge at our old studio
One Room Challenge at Mary’s house

DIY headboard

Jasper’s New Bed

First, I have to say that this was more of an undertaking than I had anticipated, and I definitely can’t take all the credit. I had a lot of help from the amazing members of team Lars. Carrie, our designer/maker, and Hailey, our project manager, both took on the challenge to design and sew the bedskirt and duvet cover, and I was thrilled with the result. A special shout out also goes out to my brother in law, Tanner, for helping me tackle the challenge of that tricky, atypical headboard and doing such a splendid job.

headboard

It’s amazing what a good bedspread and headboard will do to spruce up a room and make it feel complete. The decision to cover the headboard, duvet, and underside of the bed was definitely driven by the desire to have something distinctive, loud and eye-catching, but also appropriate for a child’s bedroom. It needed to feel cozy, fun, and warm, and the cabana stripe did just the trick for Jasper’s new bed!

I had been challenged by Waverly Fabrics to make something from their collection at Walmart and it was so easy because they have a wonderful collection of stripes and toiles. It was just hard to narrow it down! AND, the fabric is $3.99/yard so all the fabric for the headboard, duvet, and bedskirt cost less than $60! The plywood cost about the same price (lumber right now, amiright?! With the foam, bias tape, and batting it came to about $150 total for everything.

How to recreate Jasper’s new DIY headboard

We had so much fun designing Jasper’s DIY headboard. It was hard to narrow it down! I knew I wanted something I had never seen before so Gwen sketched out a bunch of designs. She sketched one out and that was it–a circus tent-inspired shape that paired SO perfectly with the fun, striped, cabana fabric we chose. With some patience and a little effort, we feel totally confident in your ability to make this children’s bedspread work! The trick is accurate measurements. Let’s do this!

Jasper's bed

Prepping the materials for a DIY Headboard

Fabric

  1. Pre-wash the fabric you’ll be using for the duvet cover. It’s probably not necessary to wash the headboard fabric, as you won’t really be removing it later to wash it again, anyway. You can decide if you want to pre-wash the bedskirt fabric, but it’s probably not the end of the world if you don’t.
  2. After the fabric is washed in warm water and dried on a low heat setting in the dryer, iron or steam out the wrinkles. This makes the measuring process much easier. Don’t forget to get the wrinkles out of the fabric you didn’t pre-wash!

doll

DIY headboard

If you’re not familiar with upholstery, this might be the trickiest part of recreating Jasper’s new bed, but you can do it! We’ll walk you through it.

Prepping the understructure

  1. First, use butcher paper to make a template for your headboard. Use the mattress and bed frame as a reference so you get the dimensions right.

butcher paper headboard prep

  1. Using a jigsaw or handheld router, take your piece of plywood and cut out your desired shape for the headboard. The full width of the headboard should be the same width as the short side of your bed.
  2. Cut out the thick foam piece (it’s a camping foam from Home Depot) into the same shape as the plywood. The bottom of the foam should rest right above the mattress when set up right.
  3. Using quilting batting, wrap the portion of the headboard with the foam and secure with a few staples. Make sure to extend the batting all the way under the foam. We slip stitched it to the foam.

headboard close-up

Prepping the fabric for the DIY headboard

  1. Measure the dimensions of the cut-out, batting-wrapped headboard. You’ll need four sections of fabric: one for the front (this piece will extend from the top of the mattress all the way to the top), one for the thin middle section between front and back, one for the back, and one for the bottom front section below the mattress.
  2. In your dimensions, make sure to add 1/2 in (or desired amount) of seam allowances to all three sections of fabric.
  3. Now, with your desired color of bias tape (we used a periwinkle blue), make piping to line the front and back edges of the headboard. To do this, take your cord (1/8″ wide is good), and wrap it into the center of the bias tape, wrong sides together.
  4. Sew along the open edge with a zipper foot so you can get nice and close the the cord.
  5. Next, align the front piece of fabric with the middle section’s fabric, right sides together. As you pin, carefully align the edge of the piping (the edge without the cord) with the edges of the fabric sections, slipping the piping between the two pieces of fabric as you go. Sew in place with a zipper foot, trying to keep as close to the cord as you can.

Assembling the headboard

Now you’re ready to put everything in place!

  1. To make sure everything is aligned right, line up the point of the fabric with the understructure.
  2. At the base of the batting on the headboard, staple the fabric in place, making sure to pull it taut.

3. Now, pull up firmly and slide the sewn pieces over the front edge of the headboard and pull them towards the back so the corners are nice and taut against the frame.

4. Pull taut at the back and staple in place. Work from both sides and the center evenly to avoid puckering.

5. Now, take the piece of fabric you measured for the back and fold under 1/2 inch. Now line up with the edge of the back and staple in place to cover the raw edges of the front pieces.

6. The headboard is complete! Whew, the hardest part of Jasper’s new bed is done!

 

headboard alt shot

Sewing a bedskirt

Taking the measurements

For the bedskirt on Jasper’s new bed, you’ll want to start with measurements. The measurements you’ll use will depend on the size of bed you have, and whether or not you have a box spring. Here’s what you need to do:

  1. Measure the length, width, and height of your bed frame. If you have a box spring, include the height of the box spring in the total height measurement of the bed frame. For example, if your bed frame is 12 inches tall, and the box spring is 7 inches tall, the total height you’d need would be 19 inches. We didn’t use a box spring, so our dimensions were 12 inches for the height, 74 inches for the length, and 38 inches for the width.

bedskirt close up

Cutting the fabric

For the fabric, you’ll need a basic, white (or other solid color that won’t show), woven fabric. You’ll also need the patterned fabric of your choice for the bedskirt, duvet and headboard. Here’s how to cut the fabric:

  1. First, take the plain fabric and cut it into the length and width of your twin bed. Add on 1/2 of an inch to each dimension. For example, since our length was 74 inches and our width 38 inches, we cut a large piece that was 75 inches by 39 inches.
  2. Next, cut out your bedskirt pieces. This takes a bit of thinking, especially if the pattern on your fabric needs to go a certain direction, like our vertical stripes. To cut out the bedskirt, think of it this way: you need one long piece of fabric that has a width of 13 (the height of the bed frame, 12, plus a seam allowance). For the length, you’ll need a piece that’s the length of three of the sides of the bed (74+38+74=186). You’ll also need to add in the length of four pleats, which are 12 inches each (12×4), then (186+48=234). Then add 1 inch to each end, so you can hem it under. The total length=236 inches.
  3. Now, because we wanted vertical stripes on Jasper’s new bed, we pieced together a bunch of pieces of fabric to get that length (the width of the fabric was definitely not long enough). It will look pretty seamless if you just match up the stripes, making sure to alternate stripe colors when you sew on a new section of fabric.

Jasper's new bed

Assembling the pleats

  1. the first step in sewing the pieces together is to hem the bottom of the long strip of fabric you’ve already sewn together (roll under 1/2 in, then 1/2 again).
  2. Hem one end of the large, rectangular piece of fabric. (Again, roll under 1/2 in, then 1/2 again).
  3. Next, you need to pin the pleats in place. To do this, start from one end of the long strip of fabric and measure in HALF the length of the long dimension (74/2=37). Mark that spot with a pin. Now, keep going in that same direction and measure 6 more inches. Mark that with a pin, then measure 6 more inches and mark that.
  4. Now, take the two pins on either side and bring them to the center pin to make the pleat. Secure the pleat in place with additional pins.
  5. Repeat the steps above for the pleat on the opposite end.
  6. For the corner and center pleats, simply calculate how far over the next pleats need to be, based on your bed’s dimensions. Pin them in place the same way you did the first two pleats.

Jasper's new bed close

Sewing the pieces together

You’re finally ready to sew the pieces together! This is really simple:

  1. To sew the pieces together, line up the raw edge of the long, pleated strip of fabric with the large rectangular piece of fabric all along the border, with right sides together. Sew in place, and finish the raw edge of the underside with a zig zag or serged finish to prevent fraying.
  2. Done! Now you can go ahead and slip this bedskirt on the bed between the bed frame/box spring and mattress.

books on duvet

DIY duvet cover

The duvet cover is the finishing touch of the bedspread that really gives it the oo la la! It also happens to be the easiest to make, which is a big relief after that headboard and bedskirt! Here’s how to make a simple duvet cover:

Taking the measurements

  1. Make sure you have the right size of duvet, then base the length and width off of its dimensions. Our duvet was a standard twin, which was 66″x 86″.
  2. Leave these dimensions as they are, rather than adding on additional seam allowances.  This will make the duvet fit nice and snugly inside of the cover, for a nice, full appearance.

Front view Jasper's bed

Cutting the fabric

  1. If you have custom fabric that’s extra wide or made for bedding, you’re in luck! You’ll just need two, big pieces that are both 66″x 88″ (leaving room for extra hems at the bottom, so you can slip the duvet inside).
  2. If your fabric is like ours was, and is more of a standard width (ours was 44″), you’ll simply need to sew it together to make it wider. Ours has a very subtle seam in the middle that’s hidden because the seam is exactly in line with the stripes.
  3. Once you have your two pieces cut, you’ll prep them for the rest of the sewing by hemming one short side of each piece.
  4. Now you’re ready to sew it together!

side view of bed

Sewing the pieces together

  1. Now, simply line up the edges, both hemmed sides matching up and right sides together, and sew around the three, un-hemmed sides. Backstitch at each end for extra strength.
  2. To finish the seams, zig zag or serge the edge to prevent fraying.
  3. If you’d like to, you can add a few buttonholes and buttons to the open end to keep it closed once the duvet is inside.
  4. The last step is to simply arrange everything and make the bed. Voila!

This bedspread is so cozy and perfect for Jasper’s bedroom, it was totally worth the time and effort it took! We are in love with Jasper’s new bed. We can’t wait to see what you do in your kids’ rooms!

Jasper's New Bed

More inspiration

Did you love this tutorial featuring Jasper’s new bed? You’ll probably love these, as well: Felix’s new nurseryour new closet system, before and after master bedroom, and designing our main bathroom.

We’ve got more plans for his bedroom. Stay tuned!