Posts Categorized: sewing

DIY + Projects + sewing + Style / Monday, 5 Jun 2017

How to add pockets to your Dress

How to add pockets to your dressI have a few known weaknesses. You know those things that you just can’t pass up? One is chocolate covered cinnamon bears. Another is cute, squishy babies. And of course, dresses with pockets. Over the past couple of years, I’ve come to the conclusion that all dresses and skirts should have pockets. Your hands always have a place to go if you’re at a loss of what to do with them in social situations. With their recent rise in popularity, skirts and dresses with pockets are more common but I still get frustrated with the lack of options! Then it occurred to me that I could simply add pockets to my favorite dresses! Adding in-seam pockets is so simple, even for a non-seamstress like me, and an ideal way to tailor your wardrobe to your liking. In-seam pockets are invisible, unlike patch pockets, which is great because they don’t compromise the style of the dress! So here’s to giving dresses with and without pockets equal opportunity!

How to add pockets to your dress

Get the full tutorial after the jump Read on →

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christmas + DIY + Pattern Hack + Projects + sewing / Wednesday, 24 Dec 2014

Christmas dress pattern hack

Last month I asked if you’d be interested in dress patterns from Carli and I got a great response! However, we realized that it’s not feasible at this point to be making all sizes so what we’re going to do is take an existing pattern that you can buy and then adjust it in a few simple steps. We’re calling it Pattern Hack.
I realize it’s rather late to be making a Christmas dress at this point in the game, but it’s still so adorable that you will want to make it and have it in your wardrobe. I’ve already worn mine three days in a row.
And with that, I’m off! Merry Christmas! Enjoy the beautiful holiday. I’ll be taking off a few days but I have a couple of New Year’s ideas coming atcha!
See the full instructions below.
 
 
This post was sponsored by our favorite place to buy fabric, Online Fabric Store.com
 

Materials: Basic pattern (this one is great!), scissors, ruler, pencil, paper
Step 1: Choose your pattern size and adjust pattern for your measurements
Step 2: Lay out your dress front piece. If wrinkled, iron on a warm dry setting.
Step 3: Lay a piece of paper over your pattern and trace cutting lines, notches, darts, and any important markings.
Step 4: Based on your intended design, draw in the seam lines. Since the pattern is placed on the fold, you will be drawing for half of the front. At the neckline, I made a mark 1 inch from the fold line. At the hem I made a mark 8 inches from the fold line. I then take a long ruler and draw in a line between your marks.
Step 5: In the middle of your line draw in a notch (a single notch on the front dress piece and a double notch on the back dress piece) to mark where to join the fabric together later.
Step 6: Cut the pattern piece on the line.
Step 7: Add 5/8 inch at the line to both pieces. This is for seam allowance. Remember to keep your notches in the right place.
Step 8: Label your pieces (dress front center cut 1 on fold, dress front side cut 2)
Step 9: Repeat steps 2- 8 for dress back
Step 10: Cut out and sew up!
The great thing about this technique is that it doesn’t alter the size/shape of the dress, but gives you the ability to be creative with a store bought pattern! You can design endless dresses with one basic pattern!
As this is our first time doing this column, let us know if you have any questions so we can clarify and make it a fluid experience for you!
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collaborations + Crafts + DIY + Projects + sewing / Monday, 25 Aug 2014

Ink-dyed clutch

DIY Ink-dyed clutch
As you might have seen from our previous projects, we’ve been loving our partnership with Craftsy. It’s given us the opportunity to try out new techniques. Our final installment of the series is the The Art of Cloth Dyeing class with JaneDunnewold. This class comes at a time when ink-dyeing techniques have made a full circle in their trend cycle. No doubt you’ve been spying all the shibori and tie-dying going on? Well, this class provides you with the basic dyeing techniques to do all of that! And today you have the opportunity to win a spot in the class (click here for more info).
In the class you’ll learn the entire process of ink-dyeing like the following:
  • color-mixing and chemistry of fiber-reactive dyes
  • learning how fabrics will react to dyes and absorb color
  • the supplies you’ll need to do it all from home
  • basic fabric manipulations like rubber banding, folding, pleating
  • how to mix dyes
  • the science of calculating how much time to allow for the dyes to react, otherwise known as batching.
  • The secret to a fast and easy washout.
  • Some more advanced dyeing techniques (they’re so rad!)
  • What to do when you’ve overdyed your project
  • What to do with your fabrics afterward
I had the talented Ashley Isenhour take the class and she said that the class was easy to follow and inspiring in creating your own projects with it. As Jane Dunnewold literally wrote the book on the subject with Complex Cloth and Art Cloth: A Guide to Surface Design onFabric, she trusted her advice and found it to be practical and easy to understand.
Ashley came up with a fancy application to the cloth-dyed fabric by making a black and white cloth-dyed clutch that you can take out and about on the town. It’s lined with a pink linen and I love how it turned out!
DIY ink dyed clutch
Click below for full tutorial!

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collaborations + Crafts + DIY + downloads + Projects + sewing + summer + templates / Monday, 30 Jun 2014

Hand embroidered Peter Pan collar & Craftsy giveaway

When I was a little girl my grandmother taught me to embroider. I embroidered everything: pillows with pictures of tennis racquets and musical recorders (my hobbies at the time), flowers (of course) on sewn drawstring bags. I even remember turning in a math class assignment with embroidered pansies on a paper plate. Who knows why and how that was an acceptable math assignment….
It’s been awhile since I’ve placed a needle to form a flower and I’ve lost many of the techniques so when I had the opportunity to take some classes on Craftsy I was excited to re-learn the process. Together with my intern Kelly Curtis, I took Design it, Stitch it: HandEmbroidery with Jessica Marquez and today I’m giving away an entry to this class (enter here).
Jessica’s class was great because she clearly went over 25 rather new-to-me stitches showing each step of the way. Kelly mentioned that the French knot had always escaped her but she is now confident thanks to Jessica’s clear instruction. Score!
What you’ll go over:
  •  7 different flat stitches with design inspirations
  •  looped stitches     
  •  knotted stitches (like the infamous French knot!)
  • Crossed stitches
  • Fill stitches
  • Embroidering on knits
  • And how to create your own patterns, (which we did below)
And what’s great about Craftsy is that you can go at your own pace, bookmark key parts of the videos, and get a full refund if you’re not satisfied. Score again!
Kelly and I worked on creating a project based on the class and we came up with this floral Peter Pan collar that would be adorable to add to a dress or blouse. Don’t you think?! Continue reading below to create one for yourself with the full tutorial and free template download.
To enter the Craftsy class giveaway, click on this link and register with your email address or Facebook login info. The giveaway will end one week from today. Good luck!
 
assisting crafting by Kelly Curtis
styling by Brittany Jepsen
template design by Ashley Isenhour
Click below for full tutorial!

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Easter + Projects + sewing + spring / Wednesday, 16 Apr 2014

Easter basket liner

Make an Easter basket liner with fabric from Laura Ashley
Make an Easter basket liner with fabric from Laura Ashley
Here’s my latest for the Laura Ashley blog. I made a liner for an Easter basket using their sweet Aviary Garden fabric. It’s the perfect springy fabric.
Click below for full tutorial!

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