Easy Halloween Ideas From Our Shop

My Ideal Halloween

My ideal Halloween is playfully spooky, crafty, and (above all) easy, and there’s no such thing as too many easy Halloween ideas. If you’re looking for a fun, simple way to celebrate the season without turning your home into a Spirit Halloween storefront, read on for easy Halloween ideas!

Easy Halloween Decorations

This Haunted House makes a perfect Halloween centerpiece and conversation starter. You’ll make it from recycled cardboard boxes, which is a win for Planet Earth, and it’s beautiful enough to come back year after year, which is a win for you! Check out our blog post on it here.

Cardboard Haunted House for recycled holiday decor

Garlands are another classic when it comes to Halloween decor. Try this fun new Halloween garland featuring the Halloween shapes you’ve been missing. If you love the spooky aspect of Halloween, check out this Vampire Teeth Garland. It’s creepy without being too macabre, and oh so easy.

DIY vampire teeth garland

Another slightly spooky and impeccably easy decor idea is this wooden transfer plaque template! I’m all for riding the line between pretty and creepy at Halloween, and these really fit the bill. Find the tutorial here.

wooden cross sections of branches with spiders and bugs transferred onto them hanging from maroon ribbons.

This painted pumpkin face template makes for such a fun, easy DIY! Give your porch some whimsy this Halloween by painting these sweet characters on your pumpkins. Read the tutorial here and get painting!

painted pastel pumpkin faces against a pink background

How many times can you say “pretty paper pumpkin project?” Whatever your answer, you should check out this template for rainbow paper pumpkins, along with this tutorial blog post. These make a beautiful, refined, seasonal table setting, they’ll look great for all of Autumn, not jus Halloween. A Thanksgiving comeback, anyone?

orange, gold, and yellow paper pumpkins on a table setting.

If you’re in a pinch and looking for quick decorations, don’t forget this post about last minute Halloween decor!

Easy Halloween Costume Ideas

There’s something to be said for a super intricate, detailed costume for sure. But even if you don’t have the time and energy to become a perfectly accurate storm trooper, dressing up doesn’t have to be out of your reach. Lots of our costume templates just require some simple clothing, some paper, and a prop or two. No professional costuming degree necessary!

Our Ruth Bader Ginsberg collar is maybe our simplest costume for adults. Just cut it out (a cricut or other cutting machine is helpful here), put it over a dark dress, and pull your hair back. Voilà! You’re ready to advocate for your sisters.

A white paper lace collar on a black background.

If you’ve been a Lars reader for more than about a minute you’ll know that I love flowers. So of course I wanted to dress up as a bouquet! Ha! Practice making some paper flowers for this Sweet Pea Paper Flower Bouquet costume (and read the tutorial here).

Brittany wearing a bouquet costume with paper flowers and a white paper wrapper against a green backdrop

Group costumes are always so fun, so pair your bouquet costume with greenhouse garb for a friend! This greenhouse costume uses cardboard and iron-on flowers, and is sure to turn heads. You can find the tutorial here. Speaking of group costumes, you really don’t want to miss our Andy Warhol Campbell’s soup can team costumes, or our Wild Things costumes. They’re some of my favorites, and they’re great for any size group!

a white woman with brown hair wears a green dress with iron on flowers, a greenhouse hat, and yellow clogs. She's holding flowers and a watering can.

Family Costume

Another cute Halloween costume for a pair of friends would be our beehive and picnic costumes. Both use an iron-on technique to make easy halloween costumes that are as cute as a bug. Find the tutorials here.

Brittany wears a gingham red dress with ants ironed onto it and holds a rattan picnic bag. a white woman wearing a yellow dress with iron-on bees, black gloves, a bee headband, and black shoes stands in front of a blue background.

This constellation costume with iron-on stars is absolutely dazzling. Honestly, you might as well break it out all year round because it’s that beautiful.

a blonde woman wearing an off-the-shoulder black jumpsuit with silvers stars all over it, sparkly makeup, and a spangled headband against a periwinkle background

For a subtle Halloween look, just print off our Pumpkin Crown and wear warm autumn tones.

Printable Pumpkin Crown

Easy Halloween Costumes for Kids

Brand new this year are our classic Halloween costumes for kids! We give you options for a witch, bat, and pumpkin. Not only are they simple to make in a pinch, they’re adorable and you’ll be glad you tried them out. One of our most glamorous costumes with templates in the shop is our sun, cloud and rainbow set. This makes a great baby and mom costume, because you can add sun rays to a baby bonnet. I love how our model matched the baby’s outfit to her sling! With this costume you can invest as much or as little as you want. Just want the Sun and Rainbow headpiece? No problem. What about the Cloud Bag and Cloud Earrings? Done. Just want a sunny baby bonnet pattern? Your wish is our command. Make the costume just how you like it with this tutorial.

Rainbow costumeRainbow and sun mommy and me costume

This Giving Tree costume is another easy Halloween idea that you could make in a flash. And who doesn’t want to reference a classic children’s book in their costume? Find the tutorial here.

A mom wearing a green outfit with leaves and holding a felt apple bag stands next to her child in red overalls. They're dressed as the Giving Tree.

If you have a gaggle of children to costume, consider our Three Blind Mice baby costume pattern or our Crayon Hat template. Both are simple to put together and oh so sweet. For more kids costume ideas, see this post!

3 blind mice diy costume for kidsFour kids wearing crayon halloween costumes in orange, red, blue, and green.

Halloween Party Supplies

Even though gathering in big groups for Halloween parties is starting to look less and less likely (again 😔), you can still throw a Halloween party for your family, roommates, or pod! This Halloween Party Suite includes printable invitations, placemats, party tags, and place cards. Talk about easy Halloween ideas!

Halloween themed place cards.

Paper party goods with a halloween theme on a black background. They're orange, yellow, black, white, navy, and peach.

And for a party favor, try these printable poppers or printable Halloween candy gift boxes.

Halloween party poppersPrintable Halloween Candy Gift Box

These Halloween coupons make a fun halloween activity for your family. They’re a great way for parents to get their kids to relinquish some candy in return for fun activities.

halloween coupons in pink, red, blue, and black.

These illustrated Halloween cards are another great party favor because you can attach them to treat bags, trade them, send them as cards, or just hang them up.

Printable Halloween Cards

If your party is more freaky than funky, you might like this elegant invitation and Halloween dinner menu.

black and white illustrated halloween party invitation in a black decorative hadn surrounded by foliage and fruitsBlack and floral printable halloween menu

Party Food

Real talk here: what’s a party without cake? Use these printables and templates to make your Halloween cake extra fancy. The Spooky Town printable cake topper set is quaint and just a bit creepy, while this Black Birds cake topper is decidedly Hitchcock-approved. Red velvet cake makes it even more dramatic!

a colorful, cute printable cake topper set on a cake."The Birds" Cake Topper

If your fall party isn’t so Halloween-specific (or even if it is!) this Fall Leaf cake topper will add elegance and fun to the celebration.

DIY fall leaf cake topper

More Inspiration

Looking for more cards, costumes, and decor? Search for Halloween on our blog! You’ll be blown away by the years of great, easy Halloween ideas and DIYs. If you’re interested in many of these ideas (who wouldn’t be!?), you can check out our E-Book, The Halloween that Lars Made. It’s a one-stop shop for easy Halloween ideas, DIYs, and projects. Also, for more festive ideas check out this post on how to get into the Halloween spirit this year!

Barbiecore Costume Ideas

Costume of the Century

I love a good pop culture costume. Remember Jasper as Jared Leto? It turns out the Met Gala is too perfect of a pop culture feast to pass up. Well, the feast of the century presented itself earlier this year and Barbiecore made its debut. I mean, what better way to usher in the new Barbie movie than with a show-stopping Barbiecore costume?

We mixed and matched a few different outfits, and loved how they turned out. Oh, and we couldn’t have done it without our amazing model, Hannah! She even brought her own pink outfit to add to the mix, which was PERFECT.

Barbiecore from Around the Web

Since most of you are probably thinking about making a Barbiecore costume a reality, we decided to help out a bit. We scoured the internet for Barbiecore items worthy of a costume. The good news is that there is a lot of potential out there! Here are some options we found that just might be perfect for a Barbiecore costume of the century:

More Inspiration

Loved this Barbiecore costume and need more costume inspiration? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. See this roundup of our best cardboard costumes, and also check out these Mommy and me costumes! Then step over to our blog archives for tons more costume ideas and Halloween content. And don’t forget about our Halloween shop for tons more Halloween ideas!

Sewing Basics: How To Take Measurements

Finding the Perfect Fit

If you’re interested in sewing clothing, either for yourself or for others, knowing how to take measurements is a must. It makes all the difference! Instead of worrying about which size will fit, you can simply take your measurements, look at the size chart, and figure out exactly what size is ideal for your body. And if you’re in between sizes? If you’re shopping for finished clothes, you either have to size up or down. But not so when you’re the one sewing! The main perk of sewing clothing by hand is that you can adjust the pattern–if there’s something that’s a little small or large in one area, you can tailor it to your measurements and it will fit like a glove. But in order to do that, you need to know how to take your measurements correctly. Let’s go!

Differences Between Mens’ and Womens’ Measurements

First, let’s talk about how to take measurements for women. Did you know taking womens’ measurements is different than taking mens’ measurements? Yep. That’s because mens’ and womens’ bodies are shaped differently, and the size charts are made with those differences in mind. Men generally have less of a difference between their waist and hip measurements, for starters. They also have different shaped chests and wider shoulders, proportionally. All of that needs to be taken into account when measuring!

How To Take Measurements For Women

The following measurements are important for women to take when making clothes. They’re also generally useful for buying clothes when you aren’t sure of your size! 

Note: When measuring, make sure to remove bulky clothing. Ideally measuring against the skin will give you the most accurate measurement. If that’s not possible, measure with one thin layer of clothing, like leggings and a thin undershirt. Also, it’s nice to have someone else with you to help take measurements because it will make things more accurate. Now let’s learn how to take measurements for women!

Neck 

The first measurement to take is the neck. This isn’t required for all patterns, but it’s useful to have on hand. To take the neck measurement, simply measure around the neck. Leave a finger width of slack so you don’t choke yourself with a too-small neck opening.

High bust

This measurement isn’t necessary all the time, either, but it can really come in handy if you’re trying to be as precise as possible. To take the high bust measurement, wrap the measuring tape snugly around the torso underneath the armpits. It’s generally most accurate if both arms are outstretched, parallel to the floor.

Bust

This is one of the most standard and useful measurements you’ll take, along with the waist and hips. How to take a bust measurement? First, stand with arms out and parallel to the floor. Now wrap the measuring tape around the fullest part of the bust. This is usually in line with the nipples. Don’t pull it too tight, just gently fitted. Also make sure to wear a thin fitted bra–not sports bra (that will squish your ladies!) or a padded pushup (that will give you an inaccurately large measurement). 

Underbust/band

This is basically your ribcage size and, along with bust measurement, is the measurement needed to figure out bra size. To take measurements of your underbust, simply wrap the measuring tape around your ribcage just below the bust. Make sure it’s snug but not too tight.

Natural waist

You’ll also want to know how to take measurements of the natural waist. This is where your torso bends when you lean to the side. For this measurement, wrap the measuring tape snugly but not too tightly around the natural waist. Leave a little slack so you can breathe in your new outfit later.

Hip

Next up: the hips. It’s important to note that the hip measurement is taken at the fullest part of the butt. Basically, you want the widest measurement you can find here so you don’t end up with something disproportionately tight on your booty. To measure, wrap the measuring tape around your hip. Again, don’t wrap too tightly, but avoid slack, too.

Sleeve length

The sleeve length is a bit less common, but nonetheless helpful when sewing. You want those sleeves to hit just at the wrist, rather than dangling over the hands or ending up halfway down your arm. To find the sleeve length, measure from the tip of the shoulder to the wrist with the arm bent.

Back neck to waist

This measurement is less common but useful to have, especially if you have an unusually short or long torso. To take this measurement, start at the nape of your neck (on your back) and extend the tape down to the natural waistline.

Inseam

You’ll also want to know how to take measurements of the inseam. The inseam is a really useful measurement to have when buying or making pants. To find it, measure right at the top of the inside of the leg, up against the crotch, all the way down to the floor.

Outseam

The outseam is also useful for pants, skirts, and dresses. For the outseam measurement, go from the natural waist all the way to the floor, this time on the outside of the leg.

Shoulder

It’s nice to have the shoulder measurement, too. Especially if you have a blouse or shirt that you want to hit right at the top of the shoulder. You can take each shoulder measurement individually, or the full shoulder width. For individual measurements, start at the end of one shoulder and go to the nape of the neck on the same side. Repeat for the other side. The full width is from one end of the shoulder, all the way across the back, to the other end.

How To Take Measurements For Men

The key measurements for men are a bit different than that of women. They’re especially useful if you need to buy a suit or dress shirt. Here are the most important measurements to take for men:

Neck

It’s essential to know how to take measurements of the neck! If you’ve ever wanted to surprise your husband, brother or dad with a nice new dress shirt then you’ll know it’s nice to know the neck size. To find the neck size, use the same technique as women.

Sleeve

Taking a man’s sleeve measurement is a bit different than for women. Instead of going from the top of the shoulder, go from center back. Then go around a bent, raised elbow all the way to the wrist.

Chest

Next up: how to take measurements of the chest. Similar to the bust measurement for women, have him stretch both arms out parallel to the floor. Then measure around the fullest part of the chest after he takes a breath in (so it’s a bit fuller).

Waist

The natural waist measurement is the same as for women. Take it where your torso bends when you bend to the side. Unlike women, it’s also nice to take a low waist measurement for reference. That’s where most mens’ pants generally sit. It probably won’t be much different than the natural waist, but it’ll vary a little depending on body type and weight.

Hip

You’ll also want to know how to take measurements of the hip! This is also similar to female hip measurements. You’ll simply measure around the fullest part of butt, snugly, but not too loose or tight.

Inseam

Last up for men is the inseam. This is also similar to female inseam measurements. Simply measure from crotch to ankle. Tip: if you’re measuring someone else and don’t love the idea of sticking your hand right in their crotch to get the measurement, not to worry. Measure instead from the wrist bone down to the floor on the outside of the leg. That will give you almost exactly the same measurement. 

Well, that’s a wrap! Questions or comments? Drop them in the comments below!

More Inspiration

Loved this post on how to take measurements and want more sewing content? Step right this way! Check out the rest of our Sewing Basics series here. You won’t want to miss this DIY Fanny Pack or these cute DIY pencil cases, either! Also, see more past sewing projects: New Team Outfits, Easter outfits, Casetify inspired projects, shaped throw pillows, Mother’s Day apron, quilted shower curtain, quilted face mask, rainbow buttons, reusable lunch sack, and DIY beeswax wraps. Last but not least: check out our shop for lots of sewing templates! And stay tuned for future sewing basics posts, released on Tuesdays.

Ways to Repurpose Scarves

Repurpose Your Scarves Three Ways

Today we’ll be showing you three ways to repurpose your old scarves: throw pillow, scrunchie, and headband. First up? a throw pillow. 

Throw Pillow

Making a throw pillow just made sense, since the dimensions of many scarves are about the same as the dimensions needed to make a pillowcase for a 20” throw pillow. The scarves we started with were roughly 18” square. That was perfect for a 20” throw pillow since generally you want your pillowcase to be a few inches smaller than the dimensions of your pillow insert for maximum fullness. 

How to Make a Throw Pillow From Scarves

  1. First, take two scarves and line them up, right sides together.
  2. Now, sew all the way around the perimeter of your square with a ¼” seam allowance. Leave a gap that’s almost the length of one side of your square so you can flip it right side out after. Make sure to backstitch at the beginning and end.
  3. Next, iron the opening down along the seam allowance. This will make sewing it together easier later.
  4. Now flip your pillowcase right side out and stuff your insert inside.
  5. Last, pin the opening and sew it closed using your sewing machine. For this, it helps to stuff the pillow down so you have a little room to work with as you sew.
  6. All that’s left is to adjust the insert and make sure it’s evenly distributed inside the pillowcase. Done!

Scrunchie

Next we’re making a scrunchie. This is such a simple little project that doubles as the perfect accessory! Here’s what to do:

How to Make a Scrunchie From Scarves

  1. Cut a piece of fabric that’s 4” x 30”. Also cut a piece of elastic that fits loosely on your wrist, plus a few inches. Ours was around 8”.
  2. Next, finish the 4” ends with a zig zag. Then fold and iron both ends over about ¼”, wrong sides together.
  3. Now fold the fabric together lengthwise, pin and sew along the raw edge.
  4. After it’s sewn, flip it right side out with a safety pin. 
  5. Then feed the elastic through, again with a safety pin. 
  6. Once the elastic is in, tie the elastic ends together in a knot.
  7. Now layer one end of the fabric over the other and sew down the width to secure in place.
  8. Done!

Headband

Last but not least, here’s a simple headband tutorial! It’s so simple, but looks lovely when finished. Like the scrunchie, it’s a great accessory, especially if you’re in need of a little pop of color. The great thing about this headband is that it’s almost the same as the scrunchie with a few variations. Here’s how to make your own:

How to Make a Headband From Scarves

  1. First, pick a headband to use as your understructure. Then cut a piece of fabric that’s 4x the headband width and roughly 55” (give or take a little depending on how full you want it).
  2. Next, follow scrunchie steps 2-4.
  3. Once your fabric casing is flipped right side out, you can feed the headband through one end.
  4. Secure that end with hot glue, then feed the headband all the way through the casing so it’s scrunched up evenly. Make sure the seam is on the bottom of the headband so it doesn’t show when you’re wearing it.
  5. Now, just secure the other end with a dab of hot glue and you’re done!

More Inspiration

Loved this post on ways to repurpose scarves? If you’re looking for more sewing hacks, try our Sewing Basics series! You might also love this tote to drawstring backpack hack. Also, see some of our recent blog projects like this DIY Fanny Pack, DIY Pencil Case, or Casetify Inspired Fabric Projects

New Team Outfits (and discount codes)!

Our New Team Outfits

We are SO excited to be sharing our new team outfits with you! It’s been a long time coming, since all the outfits were sewn by hand here in the studio. Carrie took charge of this project, with help from Sophie, Jane, and our interns (more formal introductions to come)!

Custom Spoonflower Fabric

We’ve wanted to make team outfits for a long time, and releasing our own custom fabrics with Spoonflower just seemed like the perfect opportunity. Our designer, Garet, worked long and hard on the designs for the release of our debut Casetify collection last fall. Of course, those designs were too wonderful not to use again! So we got to work turning phone case patterns into fabric and wallpaper. We added quite a few exclusively fabric and wallpaper options, and eventually our custom Spoonflower fabrics were born. Here are the choices we went with for our outfits:

Brittany: 

Peach and Yellow 1” Stripe 

Jane:

Olive 1” Checkers, Lilac 1” Checkers. Jane took things one step further and instead of just one pattern for her outfit, she did half and half!

Jenny:

Olive .5” Checkers

Carrie:

Lilac .5” Checkers

Sophie:

Retro Florals 3”

Garet:

Garet was originally going to make her own outfit, too! Sadly, with all the crazy projects she had going, she wasn’t able to finish in time. So for the shoot she’s wearing a lovely linen dress she bought instead.

Amazing Pattern Companies

Since pattern drafting is so time-consuming, we weren’t able to make our own patterns for our team outfits. But we did find patterns for our outfits at some amazing companies! For tutorials on each of our outfits, purchase the specific pattern to see how it’s done. My favorite thing about buying patterns? You can make as many clothes as you want from just one pattern! Definitely worth the investment.

Friday Pattern Company

We are thrilled with the patterns we chose from Friday Pattern Company! We went to them for the Patina Blouse and Davenport Dress. But don’t stop there! Feel free to peruse the site for your favorite patterns–there are so many beautiful options to choose from. Oh, and they’re offering a discount code to Lars readers, so head over to get 10% off with LARS10!

Birgitta Helmersson

I have to talk about Birgitta Helmersson for a minute. Not only are these patterns amazing and beautiful, they’re zero waste! That means no scraps to go in the landfill. You don’t even have to print out a physical pattern. Instead, count on detailed instructions and visuals to help you map out the cuts of each pattern. For the month of July, use the code SEWJULY for a discount on Birgitta Helmersson’s beautiful and environmentally-friendly patterns!

Merchant and Mills

A company based in Great Britain, we are obsessed with Merchant and Mills’ patterns. We chose to use two of their trouser patterns: the 101 Trouser and Eve Trouser. 

Here’s the complete list of our team’s pattern choices:

Brittany:

Birgitta Helmersson ZW Gather Dress

Jane:

Top: Friday Pattern Company Patina Blouse

Trousers: Merchant and Mills 101 Trouser

Jenny:

Top: Friday Pattern Company Patina Blouse

Trousers: Merchant and Mills Eve Trouser

Carrie:

Top: Friday Pattern Company Patina Blouse

Trousers: Merchant and Mills 101 Trouser

Sophie:

Friday Pattern Company Davenport Dress

Meet Our Team

And now, here’s a little introduction to each member of the House that Lars Built Team!

Brittany

If you want a full introduction, you can go to this page! But long story short, Brittany is art director and founder of The House that Lars Built. She is the heart and soul of the Lars team!

Jane

Jane has been working at Lars for almost 5 years now! She is the photographer/videographer & manage the studio and online Lars Shop. Jane loves design and living an artful life. That includes collecting beautiful things, interior design and fashion.

Garet

Garet started out as an intern and is now our graphic designer. Yep, you got it–she designed all our amazing fabric! She works fully remotely in South Carolina (soon to be North!) and is such a great part of our team. She loves all things creative, but especially sewing, illustration, and designing things for The House that Lars Built!

Carrie

Carrie started as an intern and is now the Editorial and Content Manager at Lars. She manages the blog content and makes most of our projects. She loves the mountains, running, hiking, backpacking and all things outdoors. Piano, art and sewing are all favorite hobbies, too. It’s been almost a year since Carrie started here at Lars and she’s loving it!

Jenny

Jenny is the Brand Manager here at Lars — she handles communication with brands, product development, project management and marketing! She has been at Lars for 7 months. In her spare time she loves to ski, climb, run, surf, read and tuft!

Sophie

Sophie is our studio assistant here at Lars. She’s been here since last fall and helps everything run smoothly in the studio. That means organizing and helping with all kinds of projects and crafts. Sophie loves Las Vegas, warm weather, and is such a fun and bubbly person to have a round!

Hannah (not pictured) 

Hannah is our other studio assistant who just started a few weeks ago. We already love her! She’s amazing at crafting, sewing and all things creative and is so fun to have around.

More Inspiration

Loved our new outfits and want to see more sewing projects? We’ve got you covered. Have you seen our Sewing Basics series yet? Check out weeks one, two, three, and four and stay tuned for the last two weeks soon! Interested in some projects to apply what you’re learning in our sewing basics series? Check out these past sewing projects: Easter outfits, Casetify inspired projects, shaped throw pillows, Mother’s Day apron, quilted shower curtain, quilted face mask, rainbow buttons, reusable lunch sack, and DIY beeswax wraps.

Sewing Basics: How to Choose the Right Fabric

Why the Fabric You Choose Matters

First of all, some of you may be asking, why does the fabric you choose even matter? Well, short answer: it does, and makes a big difference in how well your project turns out. I’ll use a bad example to illustrate my point: a heavy, upholstery canvas for a summer blouse. This is an obvious one, but there are some that are not so easy to figure out on your own! Especially if you’re not familiar with many types of fabrics and their specific uses. So we’re going to break things down a bit and help you understand the ins and outs of how to choose the right fabric.

Synthetic vs. Natural Fabrics

It turns out there’s a lot to unpack when considering which fabrics to use on a given sewing project! In order to choose the right fabric, it’s crucial to know the difference between natural and synthetic fabrics. They are what their names suggest, but they each have pros and cons.

Natural Fibers

Natural fibers come from natural sources that have not been synthetically modified. These can come from animal or plant sources. Examples of natural fibers include cotton and linen (plant sources); and silk, wool and cashmere (animal sources).

Pros

  • More breathable and moisture wicking (nice in hot/humid climates and in the summer months)
  • Production doesn’t produce poisonous gases
  • More gentle on sensitive skin (most of the time)
  • Biodegradable
  • Overall more comfortable than synthetics

Cons

  • Not as strong as synthetic fibers
  • Shrink when washed
  • Sometimes requires hand-washing or dry-cleaning (silk and wool)
  • Can be damaged by moths/other pests (especially wools)
  • Wrinkle more easily
  • More expensive
  • Can be itchy (this applies to wool, especially)

Synthetic Fibers

Synthetic fibers are fibers that can be manufactured synthetically, rather than being sourced strictly from nature. They were created to mimic their natural counterparts. Examples of synthetic fibers include polyester, acrylic, nylon, spandex, and lycra.

Pros

  • Stronger than natural fibers
  • Retain their shape better than natural fibers (think stretched-out knees of your cotton jeans)
  • Wrinkle-resistant
  • Cheaper than natural fibers
  • Resistant to pests, mold, mildew, etc.
  • Can be stretchy (think elastic, spandex and lycra)
  • Don’t shrink in the wash

Cons

  • Not as breathable as natural fibers and not moisture wicking (extra hot in hot weather!)
  • Usually more uncomfortable than natural fibers
  • Sometimes causes irritation to sensitive skin
  • Can be more slippery/difficult to sew on
  • Melt if the iron is too hot

Blended/Semi-Synthetic Fibers

Semi-synthetic fibers are natural fibers that have been chemically altered, but less so than fully synthetic fibers. Blended fibers are a blend of natural and synthetic fibers. Both blended and semi-synthetic fibers retain some of the characteristics of natural fibers while also incorporating characteristics of synthetics. For instance, they might retain the breathability of natural fibers while being more wrinkle-resistant than their natural counterparts. Examples of semi-synthetic fibers are rayon, viscose, modal, bamboo viscose, and seacell. Examples of blended fibers are polyester/cotton, cotton/lycra, and acrylic/wool.

Questions to Consider

Now that you know the difference between natural and synthetic fibers, let’s apply that knowledge to your fabric choices. Here are some questions to consider when picking a fabric for your next project:

  • Do I want my fabric to be wrinkle-resistant or not?
  • Will I need to wash by hand, or can it go in the machine? Also, can it go in the dryer or not? (needing to wash by hand or hanging to dry are not deal breakers. But you definitely want to be aware of these things so you know how to prewash and care for your fabric).
  • What season am I making my project for? Does it need to be lightweight/moisture-wicking, or thick and warm?
  • Do I have sensitive skin? (a sign that you should steer clear of synthetics and itchy wools)
  • Do I prefer a fabric that’s easier to sew on? (If so, avoid stretchy, slippery, and overly thin/thick fabrics).

And finally:

  • What is the best overall fabric for my specific project? Pillow vs. tote vs. blouse vs. pants vs. drapes, etc.

Most Commonly Used Fabrics

If you’re still a bit stumped on how to choose the right fabric, we’ve compiled a list of examples. Here are some widely-made projects and the most common fabrics for them:

Clothing

Clothing can be made using woven (not stretchy) OR knit (stretchy) fabrics. Before making your decision, consult the pattern! It will say if it’s meant for knits or woven fabrics. Many patterns even give specific guidelines as to which fabrics are ideal.

Here’s a list of common clothes to make and best fabrics:

  • Blouses and Dresses: woven, natural fabrics like cotton and linen often work well. But there are some pretty synthetic/semi-synthetic fabrics out there that are pretty, too! Chiffon, viscose and rayon are all good options. Want to be fancy? Go for silk! Just remember to be gentle when washing.
  • Pants: Again, woven, natural fabrics are great. For summer, try a light cotton, linen, or blend of the two. For winter, wool, twill, and a light canvas or denim. And remember that wool and cotton shrink! That means wash in COLD water and probably stick to hand-washing those wools.
  • Jackets/coats: Lined cotton and wool make great coats, when you’re in the mood for a more intense sewing project.

Here are some clothing options we’ve made and love! Mother’s Day apron, Easter outfitsquilted face mask, quilted sleeping mask, baby bonnet, bunny bonnet, quilted coat, Father’s Day tie and bowtiegarden apron pattern and FUNKY TOWN bandanas.

Throw Pillows

There are quite a few options that would work well for a throw pillow! If you’re going for a softer feel, try a lighter fabric like cotton or linen, or even a light velvet. Want something more substantial? Go for a canvas or other upholstery-weight fabric. The key here is that woven fabrics work MUCH better for a pillow with some shape than knits.

Here are some we’ve made:

FUNKY TOWN throw pillow, Shaped throw pillows, Celtic knot pillow and stuffed Easter bunny.

Totes and Bags

For totes and bags, generally woven canvas or denim of some sort works best. Steer clear of knits and make sure the fabric you choose is durable and you’re all set!

FUNKY TOWN tote, Lemon Tote bag, duffel bag picnic tote, Reusable lunch sack and DIY beeswax wrap.

Blankets

Blankets and quilts also demand woven fabrics. Try lightweight cotton or linen and you’ll be golden.

Try this duffel bag picnic tote, which doubles as a blanket! Also try this mushroom playmat, which is essentially baby-sized quilt.

Curtains/Other Home Decor

For curtains, you could go with a variety of fabrics depending on what you prefer! If you want a breezy, summery curtain that still lets some light in, try lightweight cotton or linen. Again, woven fabrics are your best friends here. Want a good blackout curtain? Try a double lined curtain and go with a thicker, tighter cotton/linen weave or a velvet.

Here’s our quilted shower curtain and DIY headboard.

quilted shower curtain

Fabric Resources

Well, that’s a wrap on how to choose the right fabric. Still looking for resources? Cough, cough. Officially launched yesterday, we now have a shop full of designs created by The House that Lars Built! You can find them here. During COVID, we also compiled a list of our favorite fabrics from around the web. There are so many options we ADORE. Check them out here!

Did we answer your questions on how to choose the right fabric? Let us know in the comments!

 

 

Casetify Inspired Fabric Projects

Funky Town Fabric Projects

The best thing about the projects we picked to feature our funky town fabrics is that they are all so simple. Seriously. If you consider yourself a beginner, you don’t need to feel intimidated by any of these projects. Just follow along with us to learn how to make these easy staples to add to your wardrobe and home!

Tip#1: before starting any of your projects, make sure you’ve pre-washed your fabric first!

Tip#2: when cutting out square or rectangle pieces, it’s much easier to be precise when you use a cutting mat, rotary cutter, and clear gridded ruler.

Bandana/Kerchief

Simplest of our Casetify inspired fabric projects, this bandana is the perfect accessory to your outfit. If you’re lacking a little color, the bandana will give you that pop you were looking for! For ours, we chose the small marbled and lilac checkers fabrics.

Here’s how to make your own:

How to Make a Bandana/Kerchief

Prepping the Fabric

  1. First, order your favorite fabric from our new Funky Town collection! For fabric type, we’d recommend cotton poplin, as it’s soft, light and breathable. Remember to prewash!
  2. Next, for each bandana, cut out a square that’s 23″x 23″, or adjust the size as necessary for your neck size (smaller bandanas can be as small as 17″ or 18″, and larger closer to 28″ square).

Sewing the Mitered Corners

Now you’re ready to sew the mitered corners. This is the neat diagonal finish to the corners that eliminates some of the bulk caused by traditional hemming. It looks neat and is easy to do!

  1. First, fold over and press each edge by a 1/4″, then a second time to cover the raw edge.
  2. Next, unfold the second fold and measure double the width of the hem from the edge of the fabric down. Mark the spot on each side of the corner with a fabric marker, then connect the two sides with a line across.
  3. Now fold the corner on itself with right sides together, pin, and sew along the line you drew.
  4. Last, clip the excess fabric, press open and flip the corner to the right side to reveal your finished corner.
  5. Repeat steps 2-4 for the remaining corners.

Finishing Touches

  1. To finish up, simply topstitch along the edge of the folded over sides to complete your hems. Press so it’s nice and flat.
  2. Done! Lay it out and admire.

Simple Throw Pillow

Our next Casetify inspired fabric project is a simple throw pillow. This is the simplest technique to make a throw pillow. No piping or zippers, so there’s not much to be intimidated by. The great thing is it looks lovely when done and takes less than an hour to finish! For ours, we used the retro rainbow stripe in cypress cotton canvas.

Prepping your Fabric

  1. Once your fabric is prewashed and ironed, lay it out and cut out two squares that are 19″x19″. These are the dimensions you’ll need for a standard 20″x20″ throw pillow.
  2. Now lay the two pieces out on top of each other with right sides together.
  3. Next, fold over and press both sides of one edge of each fabric square over to the wrong side by 1/2″.
  4. Pin the three sides you did not press down to prep for sewing.

Sewing the Pillow

  1. Now that your pillow pieces are pinned, sew around the three un-pressed edges. Backstitch at beginning and end.
  2. Clip corners and flip your pillow to the right side.
  3. Next, stuff the pillow insert into the pillow cover you just made and sew up the opening close to the edge. Make sure the pressed edge you created is tucked neatly inside.
  4. Done!

Tote Bag

The tote bag is a bit more advanced than the other two Casetify inspired fabric projects, but we promise you can do it! For this one we used the large retro rainbow marble in cypress cotton canvas, with golden accent handles and strap.

  1. Print off our tote bag template found here.
  2. Cut your bag pieces out of the fabric using the bag template. Note which part of the fabric you want to highlight on your bag and which direction it will face when complete.

Main Bag Piece

  1. With right sides together, sew the front and back of the main bag pieces together at the side seams. Use a single stitch and then finish off with a zig zag to prevent fraying.
  2. Next, pull the edges of the notched part of the cut fabric together (the two bottom corners) to form the flat bottom of the bag. Use a straight stitch, trim the excess down to 1/4″, then finish the edge with a zig zag.
  3. Now turn your main bag piece right side out to prep for future steps. Now to move on to the handle straps!

Handle Straps

  1. First, hem under each long edge by 1/4″. Then fold both of the handle straps in half so the folded edges meet.
  2. Next, pin and sew a single stitch down both long sides of each strap.

Shoulder Strap

  1. For the shoulder strap, fold the shoulder strap piece in half with wrong sides together lengthwise.
  2. Next, unfold, then fold each side into the center seam, pressing as you go.
  3. Now you can fold the strap back along the center crease you made. Make sure the two folded edges line up evenly.
  4. Lastly, pin and sew a single stitch down both long sides of each strap.

Attaching the Straps

Now to attach the straps to the main bag piece. For this, make sure your bag piece is turned right side out.

  1. First, position the handle straps in the center of the bag opening on each side. Align the raw edges with the top opening of the bag. Pin, then sew in place with a 1/4″ seam allowance.
  2. Now attach the ends of the shoulder strap piece to both side seams of the bag. Position them the same way you did with the handle straps and sew in place.

Finishing Touches

  1. Now it’s time for the facing. For this, take both facing pieces with right sides together and sew along both short edges by 1/4″. You should now have a tube that’s the same size as the opening of your bag. If it’s too big, make the seam allowance larger to adjust.
  2. Next, fold one edge under (wrong sides together) by 1/4″ and press.
  3. Now, with right sides together, align the raw edge of the facing tube around the opening of the bag.
  4. Next, sew a single stitch around the top opening edge of the bag, with a 1/2″ seam allowance.
  5. To finish up, turn the facing to the inside of the bag, press, and pin in place. Make sure the sewn edge of the facing/bag is creased neatly along the top edge of the bag. It shouldn’t show on the outside.
  6. Last, edge stitch along the creased edge of the facing to hold it in place.
  7. Done!

Styling Your Funky Town Projects

You can have a lot of fun styling your Funky Town Casetify inspired fabric projects! The great thing about these fabrics is that they can be mixed and matched in so many different ways. Try a marbled with a checkered, like we did, or add a solid pop of color to a busy pattern as an accent. The options are endless.

We’re excited to see what you make! Let us know in the comments!

More Inspiration

Loved these simple Casetify inspired fabric projects? Check out the first post in our sewing basics series, how to thread a sewing machine! You’ll probably also love these other easy sewing projects. Try our Mother’s Day apron or our Easter outfits (not limited to use on Mother’s Day or Easter). If you want more home decor sewing projects, try our shaped throw pillows or quilted shower curtain.

Casetify Phone Case: Honest Review (Updated)

horizontal casetify full shot

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Honest review of Casetify phone case

Last fall, we launched our new collection of phone cases! And just a few weeks ago, we launched our second round of cases, BLOOM, complete with a whole host of new floral designs. We were thrilled with the way the aesthetic elements of the cases turned out. Such fun color combos and patterns–I mean, what more could you ask for in a phone case? Well, durability and good protection for your phone. But there was no way to know just how good these phone cases would be until we tried them out. We’re still in the middle of it, but we want to give you some honest feedback about these Casetify phone cases and if they truly do what phone cases are supposed to do: protect your phone and look good at the same time.

Update:

Since last fall, we’ve had some time to get to know our Casetify cases. We want to be honest with you about the pros and cons of the cases so you’re not unpleasantly surprised by some details. So. The following reviews are from the team at The House that Lars Built. They’re complete with our customized experiences; our journeys with our individual cases. Hopefully this information can shed some light on these cases that we love to look at and also want to be able to keep for a while.

Hailey’s honest Casetify review:

How long have you had your Casetify phone case?

I’ve had my current case since our collection of phone cases was launched. But I’ve used Casetify for years!

What’s your honest opinion? How is your case holding up?

I have cracked every phone I’ve ever owned so I was a little skeptical that a non-bulky case would actually protect it. But boy has Casetify delivered! I’ve used Casetify cases for years and I’m never going back. I love that I can always find way cute designs on Casetify, too.

Brittany’s honest Casetify review:

How long have you had your Casetify phone case?

I’ve had my current one (this one with a yellow edge) since our collection came out, but I’ve been using a Casetify case for a few years now.

What’s your honest opinion? How is your case holding up?

Prior to my Casetify case I had a case that just did the job–it wasn’t cute! I had dropped my phone enough times and cracked the screen that I didn’t want to risk it anymore. I got a translucent yellow Casetify case a few years ago and loved the look because my phone was also yellow so it was MAJOR yellow vibes–my favorite vibes of all the vibes.

The case is strong without feeling like a barricade and cute so it checks off all my boxes. I put a screen protector on the glass itself because I always seem to defy all odds with cracking the screen and that’s done a great job too. (I use this one if you’re interested).

I actually chose two cases from our collection because I couldn’t decide and I switch them out. I use this pink/red colorblock one (I chose the translucent neon yellow rim) with our blue socket and this folk floral one with translucent yellow rim with this green flower socket.

Compostable

One reason I really really love Casetify is because their cases are compostable. They use their own material that is made from plants and bamboo and each one is compostable and biodegradable. They break down into carbon dioxide, water, and other naturally occurring minerals–no toxins left. SUPER into that.

brittany with two cases

Jane’s honest review of Casetify phone cases:

How long have you had your Casetify phone case?

I’ve had my case since September 2021. It’s been a game changer for me!

What’s your honest opinion? How is your case holding up?

I’m obsessed with so many designs from our new collection with Casetify. But I narrowed them down to the Pink & Red Checkers with a blue outline. This is my first time using Casetify. I love that you can customize the case and that they have a variety of materials you can choose from, especially if you are environmentally friendly.

I’ve used other brands before and they have been durable, but heavier and chunkier for my hands. My Casetify case is super sturdy and lightweight! Of course, we all drop our phones and every time I’ve done that my phone is perfectly fine with no cracks in the screen or dents in the phone. I worry less about keeping my phone looking brand new and safe. My only complaint is a small chip in my most recent case, but it still protects my phone perfectly.

I’ve also noticed that Casetify cases can be a bit slippery. Sometimes when I set my phone on the magnetic holder in my car it slides around a bit. But I do love how easy it is to slide into my pocket.

Carrie’s honest review of Casetify phone cases:

How long have you had your Casetify phone case?

Since October 2021.

What’s your honest opinion? How is your case holding up?

I’m not exaggerating when I say it still looks brand new. I’ve dropped it a few times already but can’t see scuff marks yet, and it protected my phone from any cracks, even without a screen protector. I’ve had so many issues with past phone cases getting dirty, ripping, and just looking pretty sad in general. My previous phone case before Casetify was a minimal, red one (I thought it would show the dirt less than clear or white), but it quickly started to look dirty from rubbing against the inside of my pockets and bags. With this new Casetify case, I don’t see any discoloration after 7 months, even though the border is clear. Very happy with it!

Oh, I also love that it’s so smooth and wipes off easily. Much better than some silicone cases I’ve had which attract dust and lint from my pockets like crazy. I’ve never had a problem with lint clinging to my Casetify phone case as long as I’ve had it!

Casetify cases

Sophie’s Casetify Honest Review

How long have you had your Casetify phone case?

I’ve had my phone case for about 3 weeks.

What’s your honest opinion? How is your case holding up?

Wow I love my new phone case. After three weeks it’s still just the best case I’ve put on my phone EVER! The case is so durable and cute, so it’s the perfect combo.

Our Takeaway: Pros and Cons

Based on our current experience using Casetify phone cases, we have been pleasantly surprised by how durable they are, not to mention some of the cutest phone cases we’ve ever seen.

We’ve broken the reviews down into a list of pros and cons for you to analyze all in one place:

Pros

  • Cute designs
  • Lots of customizable options
  • Compostable
  • Durable and long-lasting compared to other phone cases we’ve tried
  • Even as it yellows with time, stays sturdy
  • maintains color well without rubbing off

Cons

  • A little slippery for car magnet holders
  • Some complain that the clear border yellows over time (but this takes at least a year or more to start happening)
  • The occasional chip or dent can happen, but that’s rare
  • A little stiff and hard to put on/take off your phone
  • Can be a bit on the pricey side ($40-$80, as opposed to the $10-$30 range you’ll find on Amazon).

Overall:

Casetify cases are some of the most durable and long-lasting cases we’ve tried. No phone case is invincible, but these ones last as long as you need them to before you start to want a new phone anyway. In addition, they do an excellent job at protecting your phone while still being minimal and not overly bulky. They can be a bit stiff to take on and off, but that’s because they’re more durable than your average minimal case. And they do slip beautifully into pockets and purses without getting stuck or attracting lint. And in addition to how wonderfully long-lasting and durable they are, they are by far some of the best looking phone cases we’ve seen (We might be a little biased on this one, ha)!

One additional note: we’ve had a few people complain about the higher price of Casetify’s phone cases. As mentioned above, the cases range from $40-$80 most of the time, depending on phone model and customization options. This can be a deal breaker for some, but we find it relevant to remember that durability and price usually go hand in hand. By paying a bit more for your phone case, you’re also paying for a biodegradable, durable phone case that will last and protect your phone well over time.

That said, this Casetify collection has our stamp of approval and you can rest easy adding it to your cart. Here’s the link to our Casetify collection.

brittany holding caseretro floral case

More Inspiration

Loved this review and want to see more Casetify content? Step right this way. Here’s the post where we launched our original collection, and here’s BLOOM, with some lifestyle photos and style inspo. We’ve also done a lot of DIY’s inspired by the collection! See our retro florals backdrop and tablescape, nesting Easter eggs, and painted mini pumpkins.

BLOOM Inspired Style

BLOOM Lifestyle Photos

Here are a few of our favorite photos from the BLOOM lifestyle shoot:

We had to work in a quilted jacket somehow. I’m in love with this one!

The floral embroidery on that blue dress is just exquisite! I knew we needed it as soon as I saw it.

I’m loving the retro vibes of this shot.

Don’t you just love those pink pom poms paired with the pink phone?

Those tiny purple and blue flowers? Are you kidding me?! So gorgeous.

Secret garden fabric paired with secret garden phone case? A match made in heaven, especially with that lovely gold bracelet.

BLOOM Inspired Style

And now, the moment you’ve all been waiting for. Don’t you just love the idea of a wardrobe refresh to match your new phone case? Here are all the beautiful blouses and dresses we used:

And here are the BLOOM inspired accessories:

More Inspiration

Make sure to check out this post featuring our newest Casetify collection! And if you haven’t seen it yet, head over to our Casetify honest review to see how these phone cases have held up for team Lars! Also, check out our first Casetify collection here. Love our phone case designs? You’ll probably be interested in our Casetify inspired crafts, like these nesting Easter eggs, or our painted mini pumpkins.

Retro Florals Backdrop

Floral Backdrops from the Archives

We love our floral backdrops! This isn’t the first time we’ve dabbled in a floral backdrop. Remember our peonies, hibiscus/tropical leaves, daisies, tulips and poppies? Well, we though it was high time to revisit backdrops, this time in the form of my favorite phone case of all time: Retro Florals!

retro floral case

Retro Florals Backdrop

The best thing about this backdrop, besides being absolutely adorable, is that it’s incredibly quick and easy. It’s the perfect backdrop for a spring birthday, baby or bridal shower, or just because you’re in need of some extra color. Just grab your cricut maker (or a pair of scissors), some paper and something to stick it to the wall and you’re all set!

How to Make a Retro Florals Backdrop

  1. First, download the Retro Florals Backdrop template found here.
  2. Next, upload your template into the cricut design space. If you don’t have a cricut maker, you can just print the template out and use scissors to cut them out.
  3. Now all you have to do is get cutting! Cut out as many as you need to fill your wall, in a variety of colors. If you’re stumped on colors, you can use our photos (and phone case!) as a guide.
  4. To stick them to the wall, use either tape that won’t remove the paint or poster putty. Tip: We would recommend putting the design on the wall as you go. That way you can keep track of what colors you need to cut out next.
  5. When you’re happy with the amount of retro florals you’ve added to your wall, you can stand back and admire. You’re done!

Casetify-Inspired Fabrics

The fun doesn’t stop with this backdrop. You may have noticed the dress we made out of custom retro florals fabric! Well, we have a whole host of other fabrics for you to choose from that are largely inspired by our Casetify collections. Click here to peruse the options!

More Inspiration

Need more colorful crafts to fill your home this spring? You’ll probably love our new papier-mâché vase! Interested in more paper flower projects? Head to this post, where we’ve compiled all of our paper flower tutorials. Wanting to start a garden of real flowers this year? Head over to Lars’ Gardening Essentials for some tips!

Easter Outfits 2022

Our Custom Fabric

First of all, let’s talk about our custom fabric! Designed by our talented designer, Garet, these repeat patterns lean fully into the florals that are so appropriate for this season. Stay tuned for the official release of our phone cases featuring many of the same patterns and much more! Consider this Easter outfits project an Easter egg for what is to come–it’s going to be GOOD.

Fabric Choices for the Easter Outfits

For the Easter outfits, we decided to go with our Secret Garden print for Brittany’s dress, Block Print in Cream for Felix’s jumpsuit, Block Print in Daffodil for Jasper’s, and Block Print in Periwinkle for Paul’s tie. Since we didn’t have much time before Easter, we took a major gamble and ordered the full amount of fabric before ordering a sample first. To our delight, the fabric was even more beautiful in person than we’d hoped!

Here’s the low down on each outfit:

TIP: Don’t forget to pre-wash your fabric!

Brittany’s Dress

Oo la la, this dress turned out absolutely fabulous! We adored the combination of that secret garden print and the flowy tiers of the dress. I mean, what more could you ask for from an Easter dress than pretty florals and a pattern that’s whimsical enough to make you feel like you’ve been transported to the set of Pride and Prejudice? It’s so lovely it makes me want to sew five more! I could honestly gush all day about that secret garden print. The colors blend in such a lovely way at a distance, and up close the details are stunning. Garet really outdid herself on this one!

For the pattern, we went with Friday Pattern Company’s Wilder Gown. It paired perfectly with the secret garden print. The result was honestly jaw-dropping–so beautiful!

How to make your own version of Brittany’s Easter dress

  1. Start by heading over to our Spoonflower design shop and ordering our Secret Garden print! Follow the guidelines on the dress pattern for yardage requirements. We’d recommend a light cotton poplin for this breezy piece.
  2. Next, purchase and download the Wilder Gown PDF (or purchase the print version, if you prefer. We chose the PDF because we could instantly download and get sewing).
  3. Now all you have to do is print and assemble your pattern, following the instructions on the pattern.
  4. Just follow the step by step instructions on the pattern to make your dress and you’re done!

Paul’s Tie

Paul’s Easter outfit was simple: a tie. He loves skinny ties, so that’s what we went with! It’s surprising how easy it is to make, and looks so classy when it’s done. To make it even easier on you, we have a PDF tie pattern you can use. We loved that periwinkle blue block print pattern. It’s delicate and refined while still having that touch of masculinity when in tie form! Here are the steps to making your husband his own Easter tie:

How to make your own version of Paul’s Easter tie

Prepping the fabric and pattern

  1. First, download the template for our tie, found here.
  2. Next, follow the instructions included in the PDF and make your tie!

Jasper and Felix’s Jumpsuits

Last on our list of Easter outfits were Jasper and Felix’s jumpsuits. We used this lovely Etsy pattern! It was clear Jasper’s outfit needed to be at least a little bold, so we went with a beautiful golden color. For Felix’s, we chose a more delicate cream and periwinkle. The subtle block print was the perfect little detail for both the boys’ outfits. Words cannot describe how adorable these two boys look in their new Easter outfits!

How to make your own version of Jasper and Felix’s Easter outfits

  1. Download this Etsy pattern.
  2. Print out the PDF and follow the instructions for assembly. (Don’t forget the buttons or snaps! We used buttons).
  3. Done!

What do you think our our fresh new Easter outfits?! Are you going to join the fun and make your own? Even after Easter’s come and gone these would all still make perfect spring and summer outfits. Leave your thoughts in the comments!

More Inspiration

Loved this post on our Easter outfits? You’ll probably love this other Easter content. Try these Easter Activities for Kids, or our roundup of Easter Crafts. Our Ukrainian Easter Coloring Pages are another great way to keep kids busy this spring. Also see our Nesting Easter Eggs for the sweetest little Easter decoration. And don’t forget about our DIY Easter Basket and our Easter Basket Choose Your Own Adventure!

5 Ways to Wear Green

5 Ways to Wear Green

We made a list of five ways to wear green on St. Patrick’s Day years ago (2014, can you believe it?!), which you can find here. Well, we wanted to add to it, because it turns out we’ve had some bright ideas since then!

St. Patrick’s Day Beaded Bracelets

Just a few weeks ago, we came out with these St. Patrick’s Day Beaded Bracelets! It’s the perfect solution if you don’t want to overwhelm the world with green or don’t have any green in your closet already. These sweet little bracelets are delicate and refined, and give you that splash of green you need. You might even find yourself wearing them on other days besides St. Patrick’s Day!

St. Patrick’s Day Buttons

These St. Patrick’s Day Assorted Buttons from our shop are another great way to add just a touch of green to your outfit. Bonus: you don’t even have to make them! Just order and you’re all set. And come on, these little beauties are adorable. You’ll be looking forward to St. Patrick’s Day just so you have a reason to wear them.

Rainbow Collar Pin

Another great accessory, our DIY Rainbow Collar Pin has been around for a while now and it’s a beloved classic! Rainbows are a classic St. Patrick’s Day icon, and the great thing is that (if you hadn’t noticed already) the color green is always present in a rainbow. Plus, I love me a good little collar pin accessory and this one fits the bill perfectly. It’s cute, functional, and protects you from the pinches.

St. Patrick’s Day Crowns

Did someone say St. Patrick’s Day party? These two St. Patrick’s Day crowns are the perfect party accessory for your guests! We have two versions, a printable and DIY version, so pick whatever suits your fancy. Not interested in having a party? Then just have fun and wear a crown for the day! Its delicate and playful and you can relax, because no one will miss that pop of green.

Painted Shoes

If you’re into the subtle details, these Painted Shoes are for you. Paint a rainbow or some green on the soles of your shoes and flash those colors when someone tries to give you a pinch!

Other Options

Here are some other ideas for how to incorporate green into your St. Patrick’s Day this year:

More Inspiration

Loved this post on ways to wear green and want more St. Patrick’s Day inspiration? Try this lovely St. Patrick’s Day Wreath. Also try this St. Patrick’s Day crown, or these kid-friendly coloring pages! And if you’re in need of a new spring craft, try our DIY Paper Orchids! Not interested in making anything? Check out our shop for some seasonal favorites you’re sure to love.