Posts Categorized: sewing

DIY + Projects + sewing / Tuesday, 13 Mar 2018

How to Make Bias Tape

How to make Bias Tape

Did you know you can make your own bias tape? Do you know what bias tape is? Time for a mini sewing lesson! Bias tape is a piece of fabric but obliquely, or on the bias, used to bind edges or for decoration. Since the fabric is cut on the bias, it is very stretchy and flexible, so works well on curves. Quilt binding is one of the most common used for bias tape. However, there are plenty of out-of-the-box uses for bias tape, (Hint hint!) that make this a handy skill to have! So we’re showing you how to make bias tape! Of course, you can find pre-made bias tape at your local fabric store, but the fabrics are below average quality and the color variety is slim-pickings. With just a few tools, you can make oodles of bias tape in whatever fabric you like.

Let’s get down to bias tape making business!

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DIY + Home + Life + Projects + sewing / Thursday, 15 Feb 2018

DIY Rainbow Floor Pouf

Did you catch my announcement of the arrival of Jasper Bradshaw? He arrived two weeks ago and we couldn’t be more over the moon. He’s a total dream boat. He sleeps and eats well. We’re just working on things like “how to like being outside”. You know, the usual.

I’ve been spending some serious time in his nursery (check out the tour here), as many new moms do, and I feel so lucky to have such a beautiful space for such a beautiful little soul. The glider from Serena and Lily arrived last week and as soon as it was delivered, I sat down and and never got up. In fact, I’m here right now. It’s absolutely perfect. Thank you to all my Instagram friends who helped me settle on the fabric–it was a tough decision! Ultimately I went with “storm”, which was perfect for the rest of the color palette of the room. I added in one of their orange Avery throw, made of the softest alpaca, as well as their Astoria pillow cover, which complements the orange tree corner so well. My dear friend Merrilee, made him one of her famous bunny dolls, which I won’t let him touch until he’s a grown adult. I knew I wanted to bring in a bit more color into the space and when I stumbled on this DIY floor pouf, I thought it would be a great way to bring in the rest of the color palette of the room since it was leaning heavy on the blues. We made our own version of a rainbow floor pouf by adding in the palette from my original inspiration board (see here). Plus, the rainbow theme adds in another dose of whimsy, which I thought it needed because the room was becoming a little too serious.

This pincushion inspired DIY Rainbow Floor Pouf works as an ottoman, a chair, a footrest, or even a coffee table substitute. You can customize the color palette to fit your space. The total cost of this project is between $50-$100 depending on the fabric, so I found it to be much cheaper than options I was finding elsewhere.

Check out the full tutorial and a template!

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DIY + Projects + sewing + Style / Monday, 5 Jun 2017

How to add pockets to your Dress

How to add pockets to your dressI have a few known weaknesses. You know those things that you just can’t pass up? One is chocolate covered cinnamon bears. Another is cute, squishy babies. And of course, dresses with pockets. Over the past couple of years, I’ve come to the conclusion that all dresses and skirts should have pockets. Your hands always have a place to go if you’re at a loss of what to do with them in social situations. With their recent rise in popularity, skirts and dresses with pockets are more common but I still get frustrated with the lack of options! Then it occurred to me that I could simply add pockets to my favorite dresses! Adding in-seam pockets is so simple, even for a non-seamstress like me, and an ideal way to tailor your wardrobe to your liking. In-seam pockets are invisible, unlike patch pockets, which is great because they don’t compromise the style of the dress! So here’s to giving dresses with and without pockets equal opportunity!

How to add pockets to your dress

Get the full tutorial after the jump Read on →

christmas + DIY + Pattern Hack + Projects + sewing / Wednesday, 24 Dec 2014

Christmas dress pattern hack

Last month I asked if you’d be interested in dress patterns from Carli and I got a great response! However, we realized that it’s not feasible at this point to be making all sizes so what we’re going to do is take an existing pattern that you can buy and then adjust it in a few simple steps. We’re calling it Pattern Hack.
I realize it’s rather late to be making a Christmas dress at this point in the game, but it’s still so adorable that you will want to make it and have it in your wardrobe. I’ve already worn mine three days in a row.
And with that, I’m off! Merry Christmas! Enjoy the beautiful holiday. I’ll be taking off a few days but I have a couple of New Year’s ideas coming atcha!
See the full instructions below.
 
 
This post was sponsored by our favorite place to buy fabric, Online Fabric Store.com
 

Materials: Basic pattern (this one is great!), scissors, ruler, pencil, paper
Step 1: Choose your pattern size and adjust pattern for your measurements
Step 2: Lay out your dress front piece. If wrinkled, iron on a warm dry setting.
Step 3: Lay a piece of paper over your pattern and trace cutting lines, notches, darts, and any important markings.
Step 4: Based on your intended design, draw in the seam lines. Since the pattern is placed on the fold, you will be drawing for half of the front. At the neckline, I made a mark 1 inch from the fold line. At the hem I made a mark 8 inches from the fold line. I then take a long ruler and draw in a line between your marks.
Step 5: In the middle of your line draw in a notch (a single notch on the front dress piece and a double notch on the back dress piece) to mark where to join the fabric together later.
Step 6: Cut the pattern piece on the line.
Step 7: Add 5/8 inch at the line to both pieces. This is for seam allowance. Remember to keep your notches in the right place.
Step 8: Label your pieces (dress front center cut 1 on fold, dress front side cut 2)
Step 9: Repeat steps 2- 8 for dress back
Step 10: Cut out and sew up!
The great thing about this technique is that it doesn’t alter the size/shape of the dress, but gives you the ability to be creative with a store bought pattern! You can design endless dresses with one basic pattern!
As this is our first time doing this column, let us know if you have any questions so we can clarify and make it a fluid experience for you!

collaborations + Crafts + DIY + Projects + sewing / Monday, 25 Aug 2014

Ink-dyed clutch

DIY Ink-dyed clutch
As you might have seen from our previous projects, we’ve been loving our partnership with Craftsy. It’s given us the opportunity to try out new techniques. Our final installment of the series is the The Art of Cloth Dyeing class with JaneDunnewold. This class comes at a time when ink-dyeing techniques have made a full circle in their trend cycle. No doubt you’ve been spying all the shibori and tie-dying going on? Well, this class provides you with the basic dyeing techniques to do all of that! And today you have the opportunity to win a spot in the class (click here for more info).
In the class you’ll learn the entire process of ink-dyeing like the following:
  • color-mixing and chemistry of fiber-reactive dyes
  • learning how fabrics will react to dyes and absorb color
  • the supplies you’ll need to do it all from home
  • basic fabric manipulations like rubber banding, folding, pleating
  • how to mix dyes
  • the science of calculating how much time to allow for the dyes to react, otherwise known as batching.
  • The secret to a fast and easy washout.
  • Some more advanced dyeing techniques (they’re so rad!)
  • What to do when you’ve overdyed your project
  • What to do with your fabrics afterward
I had the talented Ashley Isenhour take the class and she said that the class was easy to follow and inspiring in creating your own projects with it. As Jane Dunnewold literally wrote the book on the subject with Complex Cloth and Art Cloth: A Guide to Surface Design onFabric, she trusted her advice and found it to be practical and easy to understand.
Ashley came up with a fancy application to the cloth-dyed fabric by making a black and white cloth-dyed clutch that you can take out and about on the town. It’s lined with a pink linen and I love how it turned out!
DIY ink dyed clutch
Click below for full tutorial!

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